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Evangelicalism & The Stone-Campbell Movement, Vol. 1 [Paperback]

By William R. Baker (Editor) & Mark Noll (Foreword by)
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Item description for Evangelicalism & The Stone-Campbell Movement, Vol. 1 by William R. Baker & Mark Noll...

Overview
The Stone-Campbell Movement, also known as the Restoration Movement, arose on the frontiers of early nineteenth-century America. Like-minded Methodists, Baptists and Presbyterians abandoned denominational labels in order to be "Christians only." They called followers to join in Christian unity and restore the ideals of the New Testament church, holding authoritative no book but the Bible and believing no creed but Christ. Modern-day inheritors of this movement, including the Churches of Christ (a cappella) and the Christian Churches (independent), find much in common with wider evangelical Christianity as a whole. Both groups are committed to the authority of Scripture and the importance of personal conversion. Yet Restorationists and evangelicals, separated by sociological history as well as points of doctrinal emphasis, have been wary of each other. Evangelicals have often misunderstood Restorationists as exclusivist separatists and baptismal regenerationists. On the other hand, Stone-Campbell adherents have been suspicious of mainstream denominational evangelicals as having compromised key aspects of the Christian faith. In recent years Restoration Movement leaders and churches have moved more freely within evangelical circles. As a result, Stone-Campbell scholars have reconsidered their relationship to evangelicalism, pondering to what extent Restorationists can identify themselves as evangelicals. Gathered here are essays by leading Stone-Campbell thinkers, drawing from their Restoration heritage and offering significant contributions to evangelical discussions of the theology of conversion and ecclesiology. Also included are responses from noted evangelicals, who assess how Stone-Campbell thought both corresponds with and diverges from evangelical perspectives. Along with William R. Baker (editor) and Mark Noll (who wrote the Foreword), contributors include Tom Alexander, Jim Baird, Craig L. Blomberg, Jack Cottrell, Everett Ferguson, Stanley J. Grenz, John Mark Hicks, Gary Holloway, H. Wayne House, Robert C. Kurka, Robert Lowery, Edward P. Myers and Jon A. Weatherly. For all concerned with Christian unity and the restoration of the church, Evangelicalism & the Stone-Campbell Movement offers a substantive starting point for dialogue and discussion.

Publishers Description
The Stone-Campbell Movement, also known as the Restoration Movement, arose on the frontiers of early nineteenth-century America. Like-minded Methodists, Baptists and Presbyterians abandoned denominational labels in order to be "Christians only." They called followers to join in Christian unity and restore the ideals of the New Testament church, holding authoritative no book but the Bible and believing no creed but Christ. Modern-day inheritors of this movement, including the Churches of Christ (a cappella) and the Christian Churches (independent), find much in common with wider evangelical Christianity as a whole. Both groups are committed to the authority of Scripture and the importance of personal conversion. Yet Restorationists and evangelicals, separated by sociological history as well as points of doctrinal emphasis, have been wary of each other. Evangelicals have often misunderstood Restorationists as exclusivist separatists and baptismal regenerationists. On the other hand, Stone-Campbell adherents have been suspicious of mainstream denominational evangelicals as having compromised key aspects of the Christian faith. In recent years Restoration Movement leaders and churches have moved more freely within evangelical circles. As a result, Stone-Campbell scholars have reconsidered their relationship to evangelicalism, pondering to what extent Restorationists can identify themselves as evangelicals. Gathered here are essays by leading Stone-Campbell thinkers, drawing from their Restoration heritage and offering significant contributions to evangelical discussions of the theology of conversion and ecclesiology. Also included are responses from noted evangelicals, who assess how Stone-Campbell thought both corresponds with and diverges from evangelical perspectives. Along with William R. Baker (editor) and Mark Noll (who wrote the Foreword), contributors include Tom Alexander, Jim Baird, Craig L. Blomberg, Jack Cottrell, Everett Ferguson, Stanley J. Grenz, John Mark Hicks, Gary Holloway, H. Wayne House, Robert C. Kurka, Robert Lowery, Edward P. Myers and Jon A. Weatherly. For all concerned with Christian unity and the restoration of the church, Evangelicalism & the Stone-Campbell Movement offers a substantive starting point for dialogue and discussion.

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Item Specifications...


Studio: InterVarsity Press
Pages   256
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 8.98" Width: 6.08" Height: 0.6"
Weight:   0.84 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Jul 11, 2002
Publisher   IVP-InterVarsity Press
ISBN  0830826939  
ISBN13  9780830826933  


Availability  0 units.


More About William R. Baker & Mark Noll


Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! William R. Baker is professor of New Testament, Cincinnati Bible Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the general editor of the Stone-Campbell Journal, and author of several books and articles. Thomas D. Ellsworth is pastor of Sherwood Oaks Christian Church, Bloomington, Indiana, is past president of the North American Christian Convention, and lectures throughout the country about church leadership.

William R. Baker has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Preaching Classic Texts


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Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Evangelism > General
2Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Evangelism
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Reviews - What do customers think about Evangelicalism & The Stone-Campbell Movement, Vol. 1?

Is the Stone-Campbell Movement Evangelical?  Apr 20, 2007
Evangelicalism and the Stone-Campbell Movement is a collection of essays that were given over a period of several years at the Stone-Campbell meeting at the Evangelical Theological Society conference. It contains several back and forth articles that are in dialogue with one another. It is authored by members of the Christian Churches (Independent, of which I am a part) and the Churches of Christ (Noninstrumental) as well as by those who are Evangelical, but not associated with the movement whatsoever.
Church historian Mark Noll writes the forward, presumably to describe what the Stone-Campbell movement is to those who are ignorant of it. His forward is very negative and one of the worst aspects of the book. I question whether he is honestly approaching the issues, or articulating what he has heard of the movement.
The next section contains two essays that focus on the historical question of whether Stone-Campbell Churches are Evangelical or not. Both of these essays admit that both movements have a separate history, with significant differences, but conclude that, given the variety of beliefs in Evangelicalism, the Stone-Campbell movement falls into the category of Evangelicalism.
The next section dominates the book. It contains several essays that discuss conversion theology. This makes sense given that this is where the two movements encounter the most differences. The biggest issue, that I believe appears in every essay is the issue of baptism. Is baptism necessary for salvation? The Stone-Campbell movement would generally say yes (though active unimmersed faith is better that dead immersed faith) while Evangelicals would generally say no, because it is a work.
The final section contains four essays on the Church, three of which are written by members of the Stone-Campbell movement. This section is an interesting one. There seems to be little cohesion between the essays, because the topic of the Church is so broad. This is, of course, excluding Grenz's responsive essay, which interacts with the other three.
This book is a good book that tackles difficult issues. The historical essays were quite helpful, especially Myers interaction with Hughes. I still hold that they are incorrect, and I believe that the historic Stone-Campbell movement could more accurately be placed under the umbrella of Anabaptism rather than Evangelicalism. Thought I might contend that many of the churches in the movement today do have much in common the Evangelicals.
The essays on conversion theology were enjoyable and enlightening (particularly Cottrell's and Kurka's). The Stone-Campbell theologians held their own and argued their positions very well. However, the Evangelicals' essays were lacking, particularly Blomberg's. Blomberg admits ignorance of our movement, which is exemplified by the fact that he thinks that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints branched off of our movement. This is completely historically inaccurate. However, it is true that an early leader in the Stone movement joined that Church.
The final section on the Church was good. I would have preferred if they stuck to a more narrow issue such as, the nature of the Church, the practice of the Sacraments, Church polity, or even incarnational ecclesiology. Grenz's response was brief, but very good. I particularly appreciated his interaction with Lowery.
I liked this book and I learned from it. I appreciate the spirit of unity, but I am wary of referring to our movement as Evangelical. I still contend that we have much more in common with Anabaptism than with Evangelicalism.
 
Evangelicalism's "wing man"  Nov 15, 2002
Editor William Baker has collated an anthology of papers presented during proceedings of the Evangelical Theological Society by members of two of three "wings" of the Stone-Campbell or Restoration Movement (RM), a capella Churches of Christ and Independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ. The third, the Disciples of Christ, is not represented.

The RM and the evangelical movement (EM) have much in common. As organized, identifiable movements (oxymoron?) in North America, they follow roughly parallel chronologies, springing as they did from the Second Awakening of ca. 1800. The "Stone" in "Stone-Campbell," Barton W. Stone, was one of the organizers of a Presbyterian camp meeting that is known to historiographers as the Cane Ridge Revival. One of the Campbells in "Stone-Campbell," Alexander Campbell, editorially followed the organization of the American evangelical movement early in the 19th century favourably noting points of intersection between it and the RM.

In the 20th century, like so many American Protestant bodies, the RM was split by the modernist-fundamentalist controversy into opposing camps -- one becoming the Disciples of Christ and the other the Independent Christian Churches/Churches of Christ. The editorial flagship of the modernist side, "The Christian Century," was of RM construction, and the first managing editor of "Christianity Today," launched by Billy Graham to lead the other side of the debate, was RM-adherent James DeForest Murch.

Over the past thirty years, many a capella Church of Christ exegetes have joined the Evangelical Theological Society, latterly joined by Independents. Independent leaders have been given prominence in the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

Although association between the RM and EM, and Baker's editorial introduction suggest a sort of "harmonic convergence" between the RM and evangelical movement (EM), the papers as published suggest otherwise. Theologically, the papers make clear significant points of divergence between the Princeton Theology-influenced Calvinism of much of North American evangelicalism and the RM on their understandings of conversion, faith, and baptism. Despite Baker's introduction, if one did not know anything of the significant interaction and sharing of resources among the RM and the EM, one might be surprised to learn of it.

A further point of divergence not highlighted is the prominence given to celebration of the Lord's Supper or Eucharist in the RM versus the EM. For the EM, faith and the book are the sole centre of attention and focus. While RM adherents claim the nickname "people of the book," the Lord's Supper is, still, given prominence and celebrated weekly (albeit, sometimes "weakly"). The absence of a paper dealing with differing views of the Lord's Supper is a weakness of the anthology.

That said, Baker does us a service by provoking discussion between two groups with parallel commitments to the book who interact at so many levels. One minor criticism: in his preface, Wheaton College historiographer Mark Noll insists on describing the RM as the "Restorationist Movement" instead of its long-standing appellation, "Restoration Movement." Is this stubbornness or merely an oversight on Dr. Noll's part?

 
Good for Theology Students of the Restoration Movement  Oct 17, 2002
Having graduated from a private university affiliated with the a cappella Church of Christ, ordained by the elders of an independent Christian Church, and now working in a cooperative mission project, I took pleasure in knowing that a book like this one had been published.

The contributors are known to me either personally or by reputation, a couple having been among my professors. Particularly pleasing were the contributions by these gentlemen, showing great respect for the Word of God and not compromising on the truths this movement has advocated for years. About half of the contributions from the independent Christian theologians were what I would consider edifying. The others show the marks of a general shift away from solid Biblical standards and towards evangelical generalism.

Frankly, the responses provided by the evangelical theologians were sadly predictable.

All in all, this is a good book to purchase if you are a theology student looking to gain insight into current discussions and thought within the movement that some call "Stone-Campbell," but which others of us prefer to refer to as the "Restoration Movement" or "this present Reformation."

 
A Helpful and Civil Discussion  Aug 26, 2002
I grew up and am still a member within the Church of Christ (a capella) branch of the Stone-Campbell movement. I found the book to be very thoughtful and engaging without being too scholarly or too polemic. The "evangelical response" chapters were nice reminders that theology is most profitably done in community. I imagine the book may not catch the interest of those outside the Stone-Campbell heritage, though I believe the book would be an excellent source of information for anyone wanting to know more about the claims and characteristics of this branch of the evangelical family.
 

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