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In a Temple of Trees [Paperback]

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Item description for In a Temple of Trees by Suzanne Hudson...

In a Temple of Trees by Suzanne Hudson

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Item Specifications...


Pages   355
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 7.8" Width: 4.9" Height: 1.1"
Weight:   1 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Jan 24, 2005
Publisher   MacAdam/Cage
ISBN  1931561915  
ISBN13  9781931561914  


Availability  0 units.


More About Suzanne Hudson


Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Suzanne Hudson has taught college English for 15 years, including courses in theatre, playwriting, literature, and composition. She has written three college composition textbooks: WRITING ABOUT THEATRE AND DRAMA, THE ART OF WRITING ABOUT ART, and THINKING AND WRITING IN THE HUMANITIES.

Suzanne Hudson currently resides in Fairhope. Suzanne Hudson was born in 1953 and has an academic affiliation as follows - University of Southern California, USA.

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Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > General > Literary
2Books > Subjects > Mystery & Thrillers > General
3Books > Subjects > Mystery & Thrillers > Mystery > General



Reviews - What do customers think about In a Temple of Trees?

A typical southern potboiler  May 22, 2006
This work is supermarket Faulkner: about as tedious as Absalom, Absalom, though containing much shorter sentences, and far less gripping than Intruder In The Dust. What used to be called miscegenation, Klansmen and their prejudices and foul language, brutality toward women, infidelity, and racial stereotypes are all in the brew, which is seasoned with a lushness of metaphor taken mainly from the kitchen -- e.g., from the first page of text, "The atmosphere back at the big house had been battered and coated with a thick crust of anticipation...." Such turgidity suggests that the author's bruited twenty-five year absence from literary endeavors was mainly devoted to culinary efforts.
 
A typical southern potboiler  May 22, 2006
This work is supermarket Faulkner: about as tedious as Absalom, Absalom, though containing much shorter sentences, and far less gripping than Intruder In The Dust. What used to be called miscegenation, Klansmen and their prejudices and foul language, brutality toward women, infidelity, and racial stereotypes are all in the brew, which is seasoned with a lushness of metaphor taken mainly from the kitchen -- e.g., from the first page of text, "The atmosphere back at the big house had been battered and coated with a thick crust of anticipation...." Such turgidity suggests that the author's bruited twenty-five year absence from literary endeavors was mainly devoted to culinary efforts.
 
This is not my south!  Oct 22, 2005
I love books about the South, especially Alabama & region but this was just not the south that I know & love. I did not enjoy this book.
 
A Vital, Intense Novel Of The Deep South - Superbly Written!  May 15, 2005
Big Jack McCormick owns Camp DoeRun, a cushy hunting lodge built on his own private parcel of West Alabama woods. Flush with game, this singular piece of forest is reserved for McCormick and his fellow huntsmen, a select group of five, in particular. These white men, are all honchos, pillars of their Three Breezes, Alabama community - the sheriff, an attorney, a bank president and McCormick's smarmy right-hand man. They get together regularly, far from their wives and families, their lip service to moral codes and the letter of the law left behind, to catch fish, shoot dove, turkey, and deer, drink, dine well and play with women, brought in especially for their fun and titillation. The aberrant is encouraged. Sometimes, there is just one women for all five, usually a beauty. Then the men would play "The Game."

On a brisk November night in 1958, twelve year-old Cecil Durgin, a "colored orphan," was working up at DoeRun. He had been trained to accompany the hunters, flush the game, skin and field dress deer, cook, clean, fetch and carry. On this one fall evening, which is to mark Cecil's life forever, he witnesses the perverse Game as it is played-out, and the vicious murder at the evening's finale. At his young age, the boy knows, as did most African Americans, that "life could be taken on any whim or mangled on a dare, that his own silence meant life." This lesson is brought home brutally the following morning when Big Jack has a talk with Cecil.

Thirty-two years later, The Reverend Cecil Durgin is, himself, a pillar of the Three Breezes community. He is the owner of radio station WDAB, and has his own show preaching "common-sense scripture," playing Gospel music, imparting local news, and offering spiritual advice. He has become a spokesperson for the black community, and politically, he can deliver the vote. Thus he bargains with those he detests to do what is best for the town's people. He still harbors dark secrets, however, and the resulting neuroses, brought on by his painful childhood, threaten his relatively solid marriage to a woman who loves him and shares his burden. Cecil occasionally drives through McCormick's woods to visit a place haunted by memories of a women long dead, and to think about the guilt he feels for endangering his marriage.

An important election is coming up, one which could significantly impact the ever accumulating wealth of the four remaining DoeRun lodge men. They see Cecil as a major threat to their plans, and although times have changed significantly since that November evening in 1958, they still have the Klan around to do their bidding. The fast paced, taut narrative moves toward a chilling conclusion, gathering momentum and building tension as it goes. Cecil is not the only one scarred by secrets, which are all about to come to light.

Suzanne Hudson paints a dark and disturbing portrait of the south as it was, with its brutal enforcement of strict class and color lines. She vividly depicts the omnipotence of a powerful few who were able to destroy, with impunity, the lives of the innocent, with a single gesture or word. Here men gave more respect and importance to the game they hunted and prized, than to the blacks they lynched. She evokes feelings of gut-wrenching fear and humiliation, as the reader empathizes with the victims of savage inhumanity. Ms. Hudson is a powerful, talented author. I intend to spread the word. This novel is a definite keeper.
JANA
 
A Vital, Intense Novel Of The Deep South - Superbly Written!  Apr 28, 2005
Big Jack McCormick owns Camp DoeRun, a cushy hunting lodge built on his own private parcel of West Alabama woods. Flush with game, this singular piece of forest is reserved for McCormick and his fellow huntsmen, a select group of five, in particular. These white men, are all honchos, pillars of their Three Breezes, Alabama community - the sheriff, an attorney, a bank president and McCormick's smarmy right-hand man. They get together regularly, far from their wives and families, their lip service to moral codes and the letter of the law left behind, to catch fish, shoot dove, turkey, and deer, drink, dine well and play with women, brought in especially for their fun and titillation. The aberrant is encouraged. Sometimes, there is just one women for all five, usually a beauty. Then the men would play "The Game."

On a brisk November night in 1958, twelve year-old Cecil Durgin, a "colored orphan," was working up at DoeRun. He had been trained to accompany the hunters, flush the game, skin and field dress deer, cook, clean, fetch and carry. On this one fall evening, which is to mark Cecil's life forever, he witnesses the perverse Game as it is played-out, and the vicious murder at the evening's finale. At his young age, the boy knows, as did most African Americans, that "life could be taken on any whim or mangled on a dare, that his own silence meant life." This lesson is brought home brutally the following morning when Big Jack has a talk with Cecil.

Thirty-two years later, The Reverend Cecil Durgin is, himself, a pillar of the Three Breezes community. He owns radio station WDAB, has his own show preaching "common-sense scripture," playing Gospel music, imparting local news, and offering spiritual advice. He has become a spokesperson for the black community, and politically, he can deliver the vote. Thus he bargains with those he detests to do what is best for the town's people. He still harbors dark secrets, however, and the resulting neuroses, brought on by his painful childhood, threaten his relatively solid marriage to a woman who loves him and shares his burden. Cecil occasionally drives through McCormick's woods to visit a place haunted by memories of a women long dead, and to think about the guilt he feels for endangering his marriage.

An important election is coming up, one which could significantly impact the ever accumulating wealth of the four remaining DoeRun lodge men. They see Cecil as a major threat to their plans, and although times have changed significantly since that November evening in 1958, they still have the Klan around to do their bidding. The fast paced, taut narrative moves toward a chilling conclusion, gathering momentum and building tension as it goes. Cecil is not the only one scarred by secrets, which are all about to come to light.

Suzanne Hudson paints a dark and disturbing portrait of the south as it was, with its brutal enforcement of strict class and color lines. She vividly depicts the omnipotence of a powerful few who were able to destroy, with impunity, the lives of the innocent, with a single gesture or word. Here men gave more respect and importance to the game they hunted and prized, than to the blacks they lynched. She evokes feelings of gut-wrenching fear and humiliation, as the reader empathizes with the victims of savage inhumanity. Ms. Hudson is a powerful, talented author. I intend to spread the word. This novel is a definite keeper.
JANA
 

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