Newsletter   Secure Checkout   View Cart (0 items)  
Search:    Welcome Guest! Save up to 30-40% on most items with our awesome everyday discounts!

Universal Salvation?: The Current Debate [Paperback]

By Robin A. Parry (Editor) & Christopher H. Partridge (Editor)
Our Price $ 21.00  
Retail Value $ 30.00  
You Save $ 9.00  (30%)  
Item Number 143839  
Buy New $21.00
Quantity:
Out Of Stock!
Currently Out Of Stock
Currently unavailable...

Item description for Universal Salvation?: The Current Debate by Robin A. Parry & Christopher H. Partridge...

Overview
Foreword by Gabriel Fackre Will God one day save all people through Christ's atoning work? That is the question at the heart of the debate in this volume - a debate sure to challenge readers, whatever their current perspective. Featuring evangelical writers of exceptional insight and sensitivity, Universal Salvation? offers a conversation worth everyone's attention. The volume opens with a rigorous three-part defense of Christian universalism by philosopher Thomas Talbott, who argues that Scripture teaches the ultimate salvation of all people, including those in hell. Gabriel Fackre in his foreword calls Talbott's work "the most thoughtfully wrought argument for universalism to date from within the contemporary evangelical community." The rest of the book gathers incisive responses to Talbott by Christian scholars from different disciplines, who evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of Talbott's arguments, take his thought in new directions, or explain why they think he is mistaken. Talbott then responds to his critics. The aim of this volume is not to persuade people that universalism is true but to open up a fairer debate on a controversial subject of continuing importance to theologians and nontheologians alike. By exploring universal salvation from biblical, philosophical, theological, and historical perspectives, the book helps readers think through the issues more carefully than has been possible with resources previously available.

Publishers Description

Foreword by Gabriel Fackre

Will God one day save all people through Christ?'s atoning work? That is the question at the heart of the debate in this volume -- a debate sure to challenge readers, whatever their current perspective.

Featuring evangelical writers of exceptional insight and sensitivity, "Universal Salvation?" offers a conversation worth everyone?'s attention. The volume opens with a rigorous three-part defense of Christian universalism by philosopher Thomas Talbott, who argues that Scripture teaches the ultimate salvation of all people, including those in hell. Gabriel Fackre in his foreword calls Talbott?'s work the most thoughtfully wrought argument for universalism to date from within the contemporary evangelical community. The rest of the book gathers incisive responses to Talbott by Christian scholars from different disciplines, who evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of Talbott?'s arguments, take his thought in new directions, or explain why they think he is mistaken. Talbott then responds to his critics.

The aim of this volume is not to persuade people that universalism is true but to open up a fairer debate on a controversial subject of continuing importance to theologians and nontheologians alike. By exploring universal salvation from biblical, philosophical, theological, and historical perspectives, the book helps readers think through the issues more carefully than has been possible with resources previously available.

Promise Angels is dedicated to bringing you great books at great prices. Whether you read for entertainment, to learn, or for literacy - you will find what you want at promiseangels.com!

Item Specifications...


Studio: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
Pages   328
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 9" Width: 6.03" Height: 0.84"
Weight:   0.95 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Mar 25, 2004
Publisher   Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
ISBN  0802827640  
ISBN13  9780802827647  


Availability  0 units.


More About Robin A. Parry & Christopher H. Partridge


Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Parry is commissioning editor for Paternoster Press.

Are You The Artisan or Author behind this product?
Improve our customers experience by registering for an Artisan Biography Center Homepage.



Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Theology > General
2Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Theology > Soteriology


Christian Product Categories
Books > Theology > Theology & Doctrine > General



Reviews - What do customers think about Universal Salvation?: The Current Debate?

Evangelical and Universalist  Jan 22, 2008
After studying theology for over thirty years, I was blindsided by what I'd always dismissed as a liberal perspective, namely Christian Universalism (which I considered an oxymoron), presented in this book as a theology of hope in the ultimate victory of God and the death of death through the atonement of Christ. The congenial dialogue/debate among the scholars assembled is an intellectual banquet that will stretch anyone's thinking. For someone like myself, who hasn't been exposed to the arguments, this seems an excellent place to start.
 
All Christians should read this book!  Jul 17, 2007
A book of this type has been sorely needed for a long time. It presents an argument for universal salvation at the beginning, then presents replies both for and against from other bible scholars and philosophers. Even if after reading this book you remain unconvinced that God will save all, you will at least be better informed of the discussion.
 
Invaluable rescource for those willing to challenge long held dogmas.  Nov 2, 2006
I am coming from this as one who first began considering Universal Salvation 4 years ago, shortly after graduating from a fundamental Bible College. In my circle of pastors and friends you didn't even debate that God's love stopped at death for 90% of humanity, so it took me sometime to find the rescources to frame the argument. I wish I'd had this book in my hand then! While it doesn't endorse one view over another I think the arguments speak for themselves. It will also provide the reader with further theological rescources to extend the study.

Here are a few quotes from the book both Pro & Con:

"For even as many Augustinians are utterly convinced that God's salvific will cannot be defeated forever and many Arminians are utterly convinced that God at least wills the salvation of all human sinners, so I am equally convinced that both claims are true." - Thomas Talbot

"As Reymond notes: 'God loves himself with a holy love and with all his heart, soul, mind, and strength, that he himself is at the centre of his affections, and that the impulse that drives him and the thing he pursues in everthing he does is his own glory.' - Daniel Strange quoting Reymond

"Talbott is indeed correct that if Christ died for everyone then everyone will be saved." - Daniel Strange

"I am convinced of the doctrine of particular redemption!" - Daniel Strange

"In this era of intense ecclesiastical scrutiny of Christian belief -- particularly through instruments such as Inquisition -- it is perhaps not surprising that an unorthodox idea like universalism appeared only in extremist and sectarian groups who rejected the authority of such ecclesiastical powers." - Morwena Ludlow

"If the penalty for human sin has already been paid by Christ, how can justice be an impediment to his mercy and His love? Did Christ's atonement only atone for the sins of some human beings, or some but not all sins? - Eric Reitan

I hope this review helps you as you search out the height and depth of God's love for yourself! Remember, as Paul says in Romans, not even death can separate you from the love of God.
 
A light unto my feet.  Jan 27, 2006
This book was my follow up read to "If Grace is True," and I couldn't have chosen a better read. While I enjoyed "If Grace Is True," by page 124 I was searching for something else. My review is under the name "llewdis" and it expresses my views very well.[http://www.this site.com/gp/product/customer-reviews/0062517058/ref=cm_cr_dp_2_1/104-7881007-0259964?%5Fencoding=UTF8&customer-reviews.sort%5Fby=-SubmissionDate&n=507846]


This book on the other hand has been as exercise in logic. I hate to admit that I was a philosophy major. Many Christians seem to dismiss this pursuit as frivilous or unecessary, but this book enabled me to center myself once again. It is balanced, and well written. I would encourage all people of the Christian faith to read this book. It is a teatise that shoud be read by all those who are interested in this debate. Secondly, this book reenforced a core belief of mine that was fostered by an author Wendell Barry. I also enjoyed and was persuaded by a book by the author of "Better Off" that espouse a vision of the world centered around personal interaction and intimate community that I feel is so lacking in the world around me.

I would recommend this book to anyone who has struggled with this topic, even though we may ultimately disagree. I have no interest in persuading you the reader (that is the authors job!), I would simply encourage you to seek!

llewdis.
 
A heady, responsible treatment.  Mar 24, 2005
Ambiguity is the devil's volleyball, said former President of Yale, Kingman Brewster, Jr. Robin A. Parry and Christopher H. Partridge's book, Universal Salvation? gives us a well matched game of back and forth with the theological hot potato that is at the heart of the book's "debate." While the writers in this volume are articulate and responsible in handling this (again) current hot topic among evangelicals, if there is one null theme the critical reader may pick up is that the debate is fueled, in part, by the inherent ambiguity of the concept in the biblical text that all sides claim for their points of view. Biblical ambiguity is the one reality few seem ready to confess when conceding an opponent's point on the issue.

The volume's "debate" opens with three chapters (Part I) by Thomas Talbott, a professor of philosophy at Willamette University and an advocate of the universalist position (in effect, Talbott argues that Scripture teaches the ultimate salvation of all people, including those in Hell). His treatment and defense for this position is thorough, reasoned, and responsible. Though Talbott's case for universalism includes arguments from theology and a Pauline interpretation of relevant texts, the strength of his argument is philosophical. His logical treatment of theological thoughts on the subject is exemplary and rigorous. Neither Talbott nor the writers who respond adversarial to his views shy away from claiming the authority of the Bible, or the primacy of Scripture to inform theology, tradition, and reason to put forth their arguments.

The remaining part of the book (parts II to V) consists of rebuttals to Talbott's arguments by other evangelical scholars. The issue at hand receives treatment from biblical responses (I. Howard Marshall and Thomas Johnson), philosophical responses (Jerry Walls and Eric Reitan), theological responses (Daniel Strange and John Sanders), and historical responses (Morwenna Ludlow and David Hilborn & Don Horrocks). In these rebuttal chapters the writers evaluate both the strengths and weaknesses of Talbott's position, but also expand the conversation beyond the parameters of Talbott's original arguments. They provide a case for their own position on the issue of universal salvation. Some chapters bog down in minutia and pedantry, which is always a danger when treating a subject as complex as universal salvation-not to mention the ambiguous textual evidence for it. For those who are "set in their thinking" on the matter, exposure to that reality may prove unsettling-and indeed, these are scholars who are honestly wrestling with the ambiguity-though not silence-of Scripture on this issue of critical concern. But then, as Freud said, "Neurosis is the inability to tolerate ambiguity." Some of the authors fall on one side of the argument or another, and others offer a mediating stance, proof enough that there is room for more dialogue on the issue.

The book closes with a final chapter in which Talbott replies to his "interlocutors." He is responsible, and gracious, in responding to the counter arguments and criticisms of his view from all fronts, theological, textual, historical, and philosophical, but takes full advantage in having the last word on the matter, at least in this volume. This is one of the most thorough and responsible treatments available of the issue of universal salvation-and its related issues-by evangelicals. A solid resource, highly recommended.
 

Write your own review about Universal Salvation?: The Current Debate



Ask A Question or Provide Feedback regarding Universal Salvation?: The Current Debate


Item Feedback and Product Questions
For immediate assistance call 888.395.0572 during the hours of 10am thru 8pm EST Monday thru Friday and a customer care representative will be happy to help you!

Help us continuously improve our service by reporting your feedback or questions below:

I have a question regarding this product
The information above is incorrect or conflicting
The page has misspellings or incorrect grammar
The page did not load correctly in my browser or created an error.

Email Address:
Anti Spam Question. To combat spammers we require that you answer a simple question.
What color is the sky?
Leave This Blank :
Do Not Change This Text :



Add This Product Widget To Your Website

Looking to add this information to your own website? Then use our Product Widget to allow you to display product information in a frame that is 120 pixels wide by 240 pixels high.

    Copy and paste the following HTML into your website and enjoy!



Order toll-free weekdays 10am thru 10pm EST by phone: 1-888-395-0572 (Lines are closed on holidays & weekends.)
Customer Service | My Account | Track My Orders | Return Policy | Request Free Catalog | Email Newsletter


Resources
Gift Certificates
RSS Feeds
Corporate
About Us
Contact Us
Policies
Terms Of Use
Privacy Policy