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The Epistle to the Philippians: A Commentary on the Greek Text (New International Greek Testament Commentary) [Hardcover]

By Peter T. Obrien (Author), W. Ward Gasque (Editor) & I. Howard Marshall (Editor)
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Item description for The Epistle to the Philippians: A Commentary on the Greek Text (New International Greek Testament Commentary) by Peter T. Obrien, W. Ward Gasque & I. Howard Marshall...

Overview
This commentary series is established on the presupposition that the theological character of the New Testament documents calls for exegesis that is sensitive to theological themes as well as to the details of the historical, linguistic, and textual context. Such thorough exegetical work lies at the heart of these volumes, which contain detailed verse-by-verse commentary preceded by general comments on each section and subsection of the text. An important aim of the NIGTC authors is to interact with the wealth of significant New Testament research published in recent articles and monographs. In this connection the authors make their own scholarly contributions to the ongoing study of the biblical text. The text on which these commentaries are based is the UBS Greek New Testament, edited by Kurt Aland and others. While engaging the major questions of text and interpretation at a scholarly level, the authors keep in mind the needs of the beginning student of Greek as well as the pastor or layperson who may have studied the language at some time but does not now use it on a regular basis.

Publishers Description
This commentary series is established on the presupposition that the theological character of the New Testament documents calls for exegesis that is sensitive to theological themes as well as to the details of the historical, linguistic, and textual context. Such thorough exegetical work lies at the heart of these volumes, which contain detailed verse-by-verse commentary preceded by general comments on each section and subsection of the text. An important aim of the NIGTC authors is to interact with the wealth of significant New Testament research published in recent articles and monographs. In this connection the authors make their own scholarly contributions to the ongoing study of the biblical text. The text on which these commentaries are based is the UBS Greek New Testament, edited by Kurt Aland and others. While engaging the major questions of text and interpretation at a scholarly level, the authors keep in mind the needs of the beginning student of Greek as well as the pastor or layperson who may have studied the language at some time but does not now use it on a regular basis.

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Item Specifications...


Studio: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
Pages   638
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 1.5" Width: 6.5" Height: 9.75"
Weight:   2.25 lbs.
Binding  Hardcover
Release Date   Jun 1, 2000
Publisher   Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
Series  New International Greek Testament Commentary  
ISBN  0802823920  
ISBN13  9780802823922  


Availability  0 units.


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Reviews - What do customers think about The Epistle to the Philippians: A Commentary on the Greek Text (New International Greek Testament Commentary)?

All reviews thus far say it all ... allow me to add this  Feb 1, 2008
I picked up this commentary not so much from the kudos on this site (although I must say all such kudos is deserved), but from O'Brien's handling of Colossians-Philemon (Word Biblical Commentary Vol. 44), and to a lesser but considerably remarkable degree from I.H. Marshall's treatment of Luke in this same series. I too was befuddled from the length given to the discussion of epistle's authorship, although Dr. O'Brien offers a few cues about Paul's unique contributions to the NT canon (I would merely argue if these cues were necessarily Philippians-specific or -centric). Many times over, O'Brien focuses on the specific texts with erudition I've never witnessed previously, and then balances this with discussions on what always struck me as textual matters that not even Bruce Metzger handled with proper weight. This is one of those commentaries where you read and chew on, then think, "if only the Church dealt more with these matters, we could certainly witness a true outpouring of the Holy Spirit." And yet, the Church waits. Thank you so much, Dr. O'Brien.
 
A Pleasure To Have And To Hold  Nov 3, 2007
'I can do all things thru Christ who strengthens me.' Philippians 4:13

O'Brien's comments read this vital text as:
`in vital union with the One who strengthens me',
cited from John Howard Schutz, Paul, pg 218

`The favourite Pauline expression `in Christ' often appears in its double form in Philippians - `in Christ Jesus'. It is a phrase denoting incorporation (`in union with Christ Jesus', GNB): believers are united with Christ in His death and resurrection, and the new corporate life into which they have entered is their share in His resurrection life. `In Christ Jesus' frequently points to Christ Jesus as the sphere in which the Christian lives and moves.

So the Philippians' glorying will abound `in Christ Jesus' (1:26). Christians glory in Him rather than put their confidence in the flesh (3:3). God's peace will guard the reader's hearts and minds in Christ Jesus (4:7), and their every need will be met in accordance with God's riches in glory in Him (4:19). Finally the Philippians are to adopt the same attitude towards one another that was found in Christ Jesus (2:5). In other words, the whole life is to be determined by the fact of Christ Jesus.' Pg 46

The doctrine of union with Christ is upheld favourably by Peter O'Brien.

On verse 1:2 `grace and peace to you':

`Grace' is a central theological notion that clearly expresses Paul's understanding of Christ's work of salvation (Rom 3:23-24).' Pg 50

`The second main word in this benediction, `peace', suggests an OT background (Eze 4:17; 5:7). In the LXX the epistolary greeting `shalom' is rendered by `peace'. In the LXX `peace' had the general sense of well-being, the source and giver of which is Yahweh alone. It included everything given by God in all areas of life, and had a social dimension as well as being linked, on occasion, with righteousness (Isa 48: 18; Ps 85:10). The word can describe the content and goal of all Christian preaching, the message itself being called `the gospel of peace' (Eph 6:15; Acts 10:36; Eph 2:17). Peace has to do with wholeness, especially with reference to relationships. It is an order established by the God of peace (1 Cor 14:33; Rom 15:33, 16:20; Phil 4:9). Christ is the mediator of that peace (Rom 5:1; Col 1:20). Indeed, He himself is that peace (Eph 2:14-18). Paul does not simply wish for their spiritual prosperity or for their internal condition of contentment; rather his prayer is that they may comprehend more fully the nature of that relationship of peace which God has established in them.' Pg 51

A quality Commentary, probably still the absolute BEST conservative one on Philippians.
 
excellent but a little tedious  Feb 18, 2007
O'Brien interacts beautifully with the Greek text! However, his sections on hymnody and authorship are VERY long. This book is so Greek based, beware if you are not quite proficient or at least strongly backgrounded in Greek.
 
Great, thorough commentary, based on the Greek  Dec 9, 2006
Australian theologian Peter O'Brien is a highly respected Pauline scholar who (in addition to this book) has also written commentaries on Colossians/Philemon and Ephesians, in addition to books on the Biblical theology of mission.

This commentary on Philippians is part of the New International Greek Testament Commentary series, a series that places a heavy focus on the original Greek text of the Biblical book in question and use insights gained from this linguistic/grammatical study as a launching point to comment on theological and historical content.

The structure of this book does not differ much from other Biblical commentaries. Several pages of introductory material (e.g. questions of authorship, recipients, major themes, outline) are followed by the commentary proper: a translation of the pericope, notes on textual criticism, and extensive remarks on the pericope. What sets this commentary apart from others is 1) the above-mentioned emphasis on the Greek and 2) a high degree of interaction with other New Testament scholars. This reader especially enjoyed the emphasis on the Greek--not because I have an intrinsic love of the languages (I don't!) but because O'Brien thoroughly lays out and defends his translation, then uses this translation-defense in order to draw out theological/practical/Pauline remarks. As he does this, he often lays out the arguments of other scholars and points out the pros and cons of each--not in a way to set up straw men, but to show why one particular choice is the best among plausible explanations. The end result is that I have much confidence in and respect for O'Brien's conclusions.

O'Brien approaches Philippians from a conservative perspective. He comes to the conclusion that the entire text was written by Paul (there were not redactors), that the recipients were the Christians at Philippi, and that the four major purposes in writing the letter were 1) to thank the Philippians for a gift he received from them, 2) to urge them toward greater unity (as it appears there was some conflict among them), 3) to encourage them to stand strong against a group of opponents from outside the church (who are trying to pull the Philippian Christians away from their Christian faith) and 4) to urge them to rejoice in Jesus, no matter what their earthly circumstances may be.

O'Brien's writing style is surprisingly conversational--I say surprisingly because it's difficult to come across as conversational when words and phrases like epexegetical, hapax, hortatory conjunction, and aorist indicative passive are used. When O'Brien remarks on the non-grammatical aspects of the text, his comments most often gravitate toward history, the personality/style of Paul, justification, sanctification, eschatology, and Christian unity. Absent or downplayed are the sacraments, vocation, the Holy Spirit, the doctrine of Scripture, and missiology (which is surprising to me considering this is one of his major scholarly pursuits).

In all, I recommend this commentary most highly for those who are have some background in the Greek. If you're concerned about the strength of your language skills (as I am), don't be intimidated. While it is based on the Greek, it is accessible while it remains scholarly and practical.
 
Excellent resource  Jan 20, 2003
You will find O'Brien's to be one of the very best commentaries on Philippians, but you will get more out of it if you are familiar with New Testament Greek. The author writes from a theologically conservative viewpoint, but is always prepared to evaluate other views, while also clearly articulating his own.

The long section on Philippians 2:5-11 has been painstakingly researched. It is thorough and magnificent.

If you read commentaries to help you to understand the text, so that you can better serve Jesus Christ, you will really appreciate this one, as well as the author's commentaries on Colossians and Ephesians.

Highly recommended.

 

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