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God: The Evidence: The Reconciliation of Faith and Reason in a Postsecular World [Paperback]

By Patrick Glynn (Author)
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Item description for God: The Evidence: The Reconciliation of Faith and Reason in a Postsecular World by Patrick Glynn...

An intellectually and spiritually riveting book reports on the new revelations thundering through modern science and discusses atheism, Western scientists and intellectuals' religion, being under attack.

Publishers Description
In the modern age science has been winning its centuries--old battle with religion for the mind of man. The evidence has long seemed incontrovertible: Life was merely a product of blind chance--a cosmic roll of an infinite number of dice across an eternity of time. Slowly, methodically, scientists supplied answers to mysteries insufficiently explained by theologians. Reason pushed faith off into the shadows of mythology and superstition, while atheism became a badge of wisdom. Our culture, freed from moral obligation, explored the frontiers of secularism. God was dead.
"Glynn's arguments for the existence of God put the burden of disproof on those intellectuals who think that the question has long since been settled." -- Andrew M. Greeley
But now, in the twilight of the twentieth century, a startling transformation is taking place in Western scientific and intellectual thought. At its heart is the dawning realization that the universe, far from being a sea of chaos, appears instead to be an intricately tuned mechanism whose every molecule, whose every physical law, seems to have been design from the very first nanosecond of the big bang toward a single end--the creation of life. This intellectually and spiritually riveting book asks a provocative question: Is science, the long-time nemesis of the Deity, uncovering the face of God?
Patrick Glynn lays out the astonishing new evidence that caused him to turn away from the atheism he acquired as a student at Harvard and Cambridge. The facts are fascinating: Physicists are discovering an unexplainable order to the cosmos; medical researchers are reporting the extraordinary healing powers of prayer and are documenting credible accounts of near-death experiences; psychologists, who once considered belief in God to be a sign of neurosis, are finding instead that religious faith is a powerful elixir for mental health; and sociologists are now acknowledging the destructive consequences of a value-free society.
"God: The Evidence" argues that faith today is not grounded in ignorance. It is where reason has been leading us all along.

Citations And Professional Reviews
God: The Evidence: The Reconciliation of Faith and Reason in a Postsecular World by Patrick Glynn has been reviewed by professional book reviewers and journalists at the following establishments -
  • Beyond the Cover Author Interv - 06/01/2000 page 24

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Item Specifications...

Studio: Prima Publishing
Pages   224
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 9.1" Width: 6.03" Height: 0.55"
Weight:   0.65 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Mar 30, 1999
Publisher   Three Rivers Press
ISBN  0761519645  
ISBN13  9780761519645  

Availability  2 units.
Availability accurate as of Oct 23, 2016 02:12.
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More About Patrick Glynn

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Patrick Glynn is the associate director and scholar in residence at the George Washington University Institute for Communitarian Policy Studies, in Washington, D.C. He has written widely on religion, politics, and foreign affairs for such publications as The New Republic, Commentary, The Washington Post, and National Review.

Patrick Glynn currently resides in the state of Washington.

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Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Catholicism > General
2Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Catholicism > Inspirational
3Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Catholicism
4Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Theology > General
6Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Spirituality > Inspirational
7Books > Subjects > Science > History & Philosophy > Science
8Books > Subjects > Science > History & Philosophy

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Books > Christian Living > Practical Life > Science, Faith & Evolution

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Reviews - What do customers think about God: The Evidence: The Reconciliation of Faith and Reason in a Postsecular World?

Is there a God? Glynn pointed me in the right direction!  Mar 12, 2008
This book's outstanding discussion of the anthropic principle convinced me that there is indeed an Intelligent Designer behind our universe -- a Designer who turned out to be (gasp!) the biblical God I'd spent my entire life avoiding. What a great place to launch an investigation into the questions of where we came from, what we're doing here, and where we're going.
One of the Flimsiest, Most Assumptive Books Ever  Mar 12, 2007
Other reviews have covered this ground but - the Anthropic Principle - the cornerstone of this book, is not a principle at all. It is well, a notion. To say that we evolved here is proof that there's a "knob-turner" being that wanted it that way is rather narcissistic isn't it? This book takes this point as a decided-upon truth in science. Um, no, that's simply not true.

If this is any measure- the most interesting section in this book, in my opinion, were the dicey stories about near-death experience. Yes! Near-death experience if you can believe that. While they all sound dubious, at least they are FIRST-HAND TESTIMONY of an experience, and not the endless speculation and extrapolation we get from the religious world.

Buy "A History of God" by Karen Armstrong and decide for yourself if there's a God. I don't know how you can make up your mind without first looking at God's insane history with mankind, who revised him, changed him, and appropriated him however was needed since the dawn of time.
God the Evidence.  Oct 24, 2005
Marketing geniuses and editorial brain trusts, who often make or at least influence such decisions, like to title/subtitle books "THE evidence . . ." or "THE case for . . .", etc, but it's generally a glossy overstatement. THE evidence would have to be ostensibly exhaustive, wouldn't it, and I sincerely doubt such a thing is possible when it comes to God, or many lesser entities or phenomena for that matter. As if my skeptical sense of the book, based on its ambitious title, needed reinforcement, as I began to read I found an even stronger reason for concern. It seems that Glynn, a former atheist now Christian apologist, was going to be discussing near-death experiences as part of his exposition on evidence of God's existence. I'd rate NDEs right up there with the Shroud of Turin when it comes to being "evidence." Sensational, yes, but hopelessly ambiguous and arguable at best, and probably misguided. But, in the end, NDEs don't figure very prominently in Glynn's overall argument. Although he discusses NDEs at some length, revealing some rather interesting cases that resist skeptical treatment, he is clear that these cases present, at best, a possible inference that consciousness can exist apart from a material body. "Intimations", he calls it, not "evidence." Well, okay, genuine curiosity with direct admission of ignorance is generally a good thing. I had feared that Glynn was going to be "nutty" on this topic, especially given some of his early mentionings of NDEs, but it turned out a little better than I'd expected. However, this discussion probably detracts from, more than contributes to, what the author is arguing for -- evidence of the truth of the Christian conception of God. He admits that many Christians are skeptical of NDEs. I obviously would not have included this topic in a hardheaded work of apologetics.
Otherwise the book was okay, and, on some points, strong enough to be considered good popular-level apologetics. Glynn demonstrates a rather sound understanding of the implications of the so-called anthropic cosmological principle, saying that, from a materialist's perspective: "The whole picture is damnably disconcerting; a universe with a beginning, designed for man. Many scientists want this picture to go away." This chapter, 'A Not-So-Random Universe,' could have been developed further. The chapters examining the evidential relationship of theistic belief with psychological and physiological health and well-being, and contrasting this relation with nihilistic/atheistic views and physical/psychological/mental health relationships, was also interesting. Detractors will rightly note that evidence for pragmatic health benefits associated with theistic belief do not necessarily translate as evidence of God's existence. This type of discussion ('how does one best live?') is relevant to 'quality of life' considerations but is only loosely teleological and isn't likely to impress many atheists.
The book is far from perfect but it has its strong points and it maintains the reader's interest. All in all, with the qualifiers stated above and a few others, I do recommend it, although not highly.
Meandering and Wishy-Washy  Sep 14, 2005
I am a Christian who reads these sorts of books frequently. This is easily the worst book of this sort I've ever read.

First, Glynn simply isn't a very good author. His style is awkward and unengaging, and he often repeats himself.

Second, he takes away with his left hand what he tries to give with his right. At times he seems to affirm the New Testament and Christ, but at other times he offers up a kind of universalism (e.g. Hindu near-death-experiences of Krishna prove that God sends to us after death whoever we'll be most comfortable with). At other times, he supports the idea that any belief at all is sufficient, as "proved" by prayer and meditation being medically effective regardless of the content of the patient's "faith".

Glynn's theology seems to be pick-and-choose. He likes what he likes (like the Sermon on the Mount) and rejects what he doesn't like (like some New Testament commands concerning women, and apparently nearly all of the Old Testament). All of this combines the be a poor apologetic indeed. To follow his example appears to mean accepting what you want and rejecting what you don't want, which hardly seems controversial.

Lastly, he simply doesn't do a good job of collecting or presenting evidence. Instead of this, I'd recommend the book, "God?: A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist" by Craig and Sinnot-Armstrong. It's easily twice the book this one is, and half of it was written by an atheist!
Don't think this is strictly scientific  Jul 20, 2005
Why do we hang on science for evidence of God? Must there be some sort of equation? Must we see ultimate fate to believe? Glynn attempts to say no, that there is overwhelming evidence of God in the world now, even though many claim him "dead."

Glynn doesn't speak much about the scientific proofs of God. But, he does mention the hated Anthropic Principal. Which is "too convenient," according to evolutionists. Interestingly, though Glynn believes in "God," and that the world cannot have come by chance, he does seem to believe that the world started billions of years ago. Only to later argue that "gradualism" evolution is phony. So, the world existed, but nothing happened for billions of years. That's the weakest link of the book, in my opinion.

IF YOU WANT SOME REAL scientific proof that evolution is struggling, take a look at a Kansas school board's findings while conducting research on the true validity of evolution. It seems that a BUNCH of scientists think that it is no longer Truth, but philosophy. It is a PDF file, and quite long, but it really is worth reading. Really.

Glynn does offer some revealing common-sense proofs that God exists. For example, Glynn discusses the age of pure Darwinism. That is, when Darwinism had the church (or science for that matter) in a headlock, and so people lived as if they had to answer for nothing. The "roaring 20's," and 60's and 70's are perfect examples. The 20's brought out the social policy actually dubbed "social Darwinism." Because of this, few gained riches, while millions of others lived in poverty. Then came the depression. The 60's and 70's brought about sex, drugs, and "peace." It's kind of hard to live with peace when your crotch burns from sexually transmitted diseases. While the former of the two is not mentioned (I made that connection myself, after, of course, reading the latter), it is interesting how we tend to pay when we "kill" God. Could that be chance? Sure, says Glynn, if that helps you sleep better at night.

Glynn also speaks of the changes being made in philosophy, the fraud of Freud, and how mental health seems to be connected with religion. This, though, should be taken quite lightly. Statistics can ALWAYS be twisted to support someone's views. As someone once said, "there are lies, and then there are statistics."

Finally, Glynn discusses NDE's. I recently read a book entitled, 90 Minutes in Heaven, which discusses these and I would take a gander if I had the time. But, Glynn talks about Moody's work mostly. Now, I really liked what he said. But, it seems Moody has changed his mind on NDE's himself. Though I am not sure at the implications, I would read up on that myself, and not take anything without personal research. What was given was fascinating, and what's more, in a recent Scientific American, one writer admits to NDE's, but attempts to say that our brains are "wired for them." It seems odd, but possible, I guess.

Glynn is no literary master. In fact, I think a 12 year old, with a decent education, could read this book. With the oddity of time aside, Glynn packs a pretty powerful punch. It's certainly worth a read.

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