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Commentary to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason [Paperback]

By Norman Kemp Smith (Author)
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Item description for Commentary to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason by Norman Kemp Smith...

Kant's Critique of Pure Reason is a philosophical classic that marks a turning-point in the history of philosophy. Kemp Smith's Commentary, written at the beginning of the 20th century, has become a classic in its own right. Both expository and critical, Kemp Smith seeks to subordinate the treatment of textual questions and of minor issues to the systematic discussion of the central problems posed by Kant's Critique. Kemp Smith's momentous work is therefore invaluable both to students of the Critique itself and to those wanting to delve more deeply into systematic discussions of Kant's teachings.

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Item Specifications...

Studio: Prometheus Books
Pages   724
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 9.37" Width: 6.1" Height: 1.52"
Weight:   2.17 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Nov 1, 1991
Publisher   Prometheus Books
ISBN  1573923117  
ISBN13  9781573923118  

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More About Norman Kemp Smith

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Norman Kemp Smith (1872-1958) was Professor of Logic and Metaphysics at the University of Edinburgh. Amongst his books are "New Studies in the Philosophy of Descartes," "The Credibility of Divine Existence" and his translation of Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason,"
Don Garrett is Kenan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of North Carlolina, Chapel Hill. He is the Co-Editor of the journal "Hume Studies," and "The Encyclopedia of Empiricism," author of "Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy," editor of "The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza" and "Early Modern Philosophy" (OUP forthcoming).

Norman Kemp Smith was born in 1872 and died in 1958.

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1Books > Subjects > Nonfiction > Philosophy > Epistemology
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4Books > Subjects > Nonfiction > Philosophy > Logic & Language

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Reviews - What do customers think about Commentary to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason?

Kemp Smith's Obsession  Oct 22, 2005
Based on Chris Limmek's review Norman Kemp Smith's commentary must be excellent! Because with Kant (and all difficult works) you need to spend pages "obsessing over terminological minutiae" and you need to focus on "differentiating different lines of argument" (etc)
Kemp Smith's Obsession  May 8, 2002
This commentary is extremely poor for a variety of reasons. First, Kemp Smith is one of the most notable translators of Kant's first Critique. One might think that this would add to the quality of his commentary, but in fact, it significantly detracts from it, as Smith spends pages obsessing over terminological minutiae and frequently misses the forrest for the trees. Second, Smith has something like a documentary hypothesis that governs his interpretation of the first Critique. He tends to think that the Critique is a haphazard collection of notes written by Kant during various periods of his philosophical development which were cobbled together only as late as two decades after being written. Accordingly, whenever he encounters any difficulty interpreting the text, he simply chalks it up to Kant's hodge podge text rather than attempting to gain some interesting insight into the material. Third, he tends to find five arguments for every one that Kant presents. His excessive focus on differentiating different lines of argument again distracts him from the larger issues raised by the text. The result is a commentary that provides great insight into the interpretive decisions of a translator, but no insight into the mind of a great philosopher.
An ampliative forrest preceeding an analytical exposition.  Jun 29, 2000
Anyone who has read this book in its totality is either a hardcore academic, or simply likes taking forty minutes a page. This kind of work is not to be confused with the light and soapy philosophies that we see in company statements, nor the glib employment of the word used by e-xtraverts on their home pages (my philosophy is...). This book looks, through ampliative means, to bridge the erstwhile gap between the ungrounded claims of arch-Rationalists,such as Liebnitz, who enable the possibility of metaphysics devoid of any 'sensible' checks (in Kants sense), and the dry sobriety of Empiricists such as Hume, whose statements regarding such things as the non a-prioricity of cause and effect; the lack of any necessary logical link between two events, leave us in a permanant probabilistic divide between what is, and what must be. However, take heart, the dry but illuminated Kant, puts man back at the centre of his own universe (and something, we know not what, at the center of man). Reading this book is not a passive activity! Knowledge of other positions in Philosophy is also going to ease the way with this volume. If you have the time and the inclination, you may never switch your brain off again! When people see it on your shelf, just say "Ahh, Hmm", then nod slowly. This way you need not back your self into any difficult conversations! (that's how I do it).
best translation available  Aug 6, 1999
This is recognized as the best and most thorough of any translation of this particular work of Kant. I also recommend,if you can find, S.Korner, his commentary of the Critique happens to be extremely well written and concise. Both are a must for those whose are Kantian scholars, as well as, the interested in general. The chapters on space and time are excellent.
Legendary among grad students......  Mar 2, 1999
When this title was offered in paper, I snapped it up. This book was constantly cited by professors at the graduate level, but no students had ever seen a copy....It seemed to be "permanently" checked out by the instructors.

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