Newsletter   Secure Checkout   Shopping Cart (0 Items)  
Search:    Welcome Guest! Save up to 30-40% on most items with our awesome everyday discounts!

Why I Left the Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions of a Former Worship Leader [Paperback]

By Dan Lucarini (Author) & John Blanchard (Foreword by)
Our Price $ 9.79  
Retail Value $ 13.99  
You Save $ 4.20  (30%)  
Item Number 16975  
Buy New $9.79
Quantity:
Out Of Stock!
Currently Out Of Stock
Currently unavailable...

Item description for Why I Left the Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions of a Former Worship Leader by Dan Lucarini & John Blanchard...

Overview
Confessions of a former worship leader

For many churches today, music has become one of the most important factors in both their mode of worship and their attempts to reach unbelievers with the gospel. Writing from his own personal experience as a former worship leader, Dan Lucarini questions the use of contemporary music in the worship of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and shows why he believes many churches have been deceived into using ever-increasing worldly means to ?reach the lost?. He has seen at first hand how an emphasis on music, and the ultimate move towards rock music in particular, has caused divisions in the church, and turned the emphasis in worship away from the Lord towards ourselves.

This warm and heartfelt account is intended to highlight these dangers and to help churches wishing to reverse this trend return God to his rightful place as the centre of our worship.

Publishers Description
For many churches today, music has become one of the most important factors in attempting to reach unbelievers with the gospel. Writing from his own personal experience as a former worship leader, Dan Lucarini questions the use of contemporary music in the worship of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

Community Description
For many churches today, music has become one of the most important factors in both their mode of worship and their attempts to reach unbelievers with the gospel. Writing from his own personal experience as a former worship leader, Dan Lucarini questions the use of contemporary music in the worship of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and shows why he believes many churches have been deceived into using ever-increasing worldly means to 'reach the lost'. He has seen at first hand how an emphasis on music, and the ultimate move towards rock music in particular, has caused divisions in the church, and turned the emphasis in worship away from the Lord towards ourselves.

This warm and heartfelt account is intended to highlight these dangers and to help churches wishing to reverse this trend return God to his rightful place as the centre of our worship.
Please Note, Community Descriptions and notes are submitted by our shoppers, and are not guaranteed for accuracy.


Promise Angels is dedicated to bringing you great books at great prices. Whether you read for entertainment, to learn, or for literacy - you will find what you want at promiseangels.com!

Item Specifications...


Studio: EP Books
Pages   144
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 8.56" Width: 5.58" Height: 0.39"
Weight:   0.47 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Jul 1, 2002
Publisher   EVANGELICAL PRESS #532
ISBN  0852345178  
ISBN13  9780852345177  


Availability  0 units.


More About Dan Lucarini & John Blanchard


Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Lucarini is a businessman who was a worship leader for several evangelical churches in the USA, and was also a rock music performer, arranger and composer.

Dan Lucarini currently resides in the state of Colorado.

Are You The Artisan or Author behind this product?
Improve our customers experience by registering for an Artisan Biography Center Homepage.



Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Biographies & Memoirs > Arts & Literature > Biographies > Classical > General
2Books > Subjects > Biographies & Memoirs > Arts & Literature > Biographies > General
3Books > Subjects > Biographies & Memoirs > Memoirs
4Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Christian Living > Faith
5Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Christian Living > General
6Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Christian Living > Leadership


Christian Product Categories
Books > Inspiration > Motivation > Biography & Autobiography



Similar Products



Reviews - What do customers think about Why I Left Contemporary Christian Music Movement?

Amazing Grace  Mar 27, 2007
In the 1800's, I'm sure that John Newton's "Amazing Grace" was considered and condemned as Contemporary Christian Music. "How Great Thou Art" was CCM back in 1953. Many of our most famous hymns had Christian lyrics put to bar room tunes. Why? Because they were familiar and easily learned by the average citizen. These songs fit right in with the music of their era, and thus, they were the CCM of their day.
Every generation's music is considered "contemporary" and usually hated by the previous generation. My father disliked and disapproved of my 70's era rock, and his father disapproved of the Glen Miller era. My son's music does not appeal to me, but to spiritualize my taste in music is a huge mistake. The only exception would be if, and only if, the music/words violate unmistakable Christian doctrine. For example, if the song advocates infidelity, then that would be grounds to condemn the song. But condemning a song because one doesn't like the music style is unwise. Personally I can't stomach rap music. Some of it is contrary to Scripture, but to wholesale condemn it all as evil is contrary to common sense. I simply choose not to listen to it while encouraging my son make wise choices in the music he listens to.
Most Contemporary Christian Music does not appeal to me, but I have to look beyond ME (Remember the first four words of The Purpose Driven Life?). If the songs and the artist are of Scriptural integrity and the fruits of that music are positively influencing believers and non-believers alike, then who am I (or you) to hinder the Holy Spirit's work.
Poor old John Newton. He probably caught a lot of flak from church elders for writing that radical CCM song, "Amazing Grace". Isn't it possible that some of the very songs being written today by CCM artists might just be the hymns of the future?
Just a few thoughts after reading, "Why I Left The Contemporary Christian Music Movement: Confessions Of A Former Worship Leader
by Dan Lucarini".
 
Nuts!  Mar 19, 2007
Not long after they parachuted into Normandy on D-Day, the 101st Airborne was surrounded by German units. The German commander subsequently demanded their surrender. My review of this work is the same single word as Anthony McAuliffe's response to the German surrender demand: "Nuts!"
 
Dan Lucarini Vs. Rick Warren  Jan 4, 2007
Dan Lucarini was involved with rock and roll before becoming a Christian, and he brought it with him to his Church when he began regularly attending. Because of his worldly music experience, in no time he became the worship leader. Those who opposed the new trend of contemporary music in Church had trouble putting reasons for their convictions into words. Mr. Lucarini regrets that he was not more sensitive to their concerns. He has had a change of heart and now writes that, "God inhabits the praise of His people without the presence of controversial music styles and performances that closely imitate the world's music system."

He quotes Rick Warren, of 40 Days of Purpose fame, whose writings emphasize the importance of upbeat music in services. The quotes clearly reveal that Mr. Warren considers contemporary music more conducive to the seeker-friendly atmosphere which emphasizes outreach more than the blood of Christ. While reaching the lost is important, Mr. Lucarini contends that it is important to have outreach without moral compromise. While we may be "seekers", a more accurate term might be "sinners".

Many churches that use contemporary music follow the Bible in all areas except music. But Lucarini asks, "How could we possibly expect God to accept our worship and bless us, if we define worship in any other fashion than what His Word requires?"

Biblical worship does not generally consist of looking up toward heaven and feeling good. While David danced before the Lord, we find more of an emphasis on bowing in reverence and humility to Almighty God. This goes against our consumer-driven culture so it's not surprising that content-light, theologically challenged choruses are more popular in many Churches than the spiritual depth of hymns with lyrics that carry sound doctrine. Under the guise of reaching the un-churched, contemporary music appeals to fleshly interests, and the author states, "Our worship must be based on truth as `it is written', not on our experience, our feelings, the felt needs of the consumer, or our man-centred version of the truth."

Living a holy life entails being careful about what fashions I embrace and putting my brother's need above my own. Mr. Lucarini's logic is convincing.
 
In need of serious theological reflection.   Jul 8, 2006
At first I thought that this book was a tongue in cheek poke at the church and I found it most humourous, but much later on it occurred to me that this guy might actually be serious.

When you trip past Dan's all too frquent rhetoric, simply put, Dan's argument is that Rock music is innately evil and that the church should return to non-evil music such as the traditional hymns rather than the rock music of the pagans. The logic goes that following such evil music will cause us to lose our self control and our true worship of God and to lapse into immorality.

Now to be fair, there is nothing new about this argument, however, theology, psychology, and even the history of music are not on Dan's side. One can trace this line of thinking right back to the ancient Greeks. As Friedrich Nietzsche points out so aptly in his classic 'The Birth of Tragedy', the Greeks created Apollo (the diety of reflective music) and pitted him against Dionysus (which we can equate with rock music). These two warring forces eventually arrived at a peace treaty whereby Apollo reigned and for only for three days per year was Dionysus allowed to reveal himself (the festival of the Greater Dionysia). The problem with this, as Nietzsche illustrates is that by doing this you have effectively emasculated your true self for both the music of Apollo and Dionysus are valid parts of your own true soul. In essence both of these forms of music represent who we really are, our true soul if you like. Lucarini clearly takes the side of Apollo and his proposal is to return to the purity of the pipe organ and to suppress our Dionysian urges altogether. One can see why Nietzsche came to hate the church so vehemently as it ends up denying life.

Luciarini's urge to caution us to the idolatroy of music is well put and this is the best (any perhaps only valid) argument in the book. However it is also a problem for both forms of music, both the rock music and the music of the pipe organ that he so wants us to return to. One must consider where this 'theological' reflective music that Luciarini elevates came from. Alistair McGrath points this out in his great book 'The Twilight of Atheism' where he shows that this so called theological music arose as a response to Immanuel Kant and the illumination of revelation. If revelation of God is gone (as Kant would have us believe) then all that is left is to teach people categorical truths of God, and as McGrath points out we therefore have the painting of the vatican and the theological hymns all of which are attempts to do this. Thank God that the church has moved on and that Nietzsche's critique of the church is no longer valid in this respect. Luciarini though calls us back to the dark ages. Luciarini has not grasped at all the manifestation of the Holy Spirit within CCM and the revival of revelation nor has he grasped at anytime what worship, within this context would look like. Now I like both types of music as in their different ways both of them help to point me to God and in their place they are both ultimately helpful. Nevertheless Luciarini feels the need to write off an entire segment of the church because it doesn't work for him. Poor little boy.

Now I can sympathise with Nietzsche because he wrestled with it and thought about it, but I struggle to find the same compassion for Luciarini. It is somewhat of a pity that someone hasn't tried to help Luciarini through his problems and to help him deal with his obvious resentment. Nevertheless this is not an excuse for producing a work that is so poorly thought out and so sloppy in execution.

Fortunately for those that love contemporary worship and find that it releases them into the Holy Spirit in ways that more traditional music cannot, this is one of those books that will fall on deaf ears (pun intended).

One star for the humour, but this is clearly not a serious attempt.
 
A very much needed book for the TRUTH!  May 10, 2006
Obviously, there is a division about this book from some of the things people are saying. The writer is not pompous as one person who wrote thinks. A 15 year in one of the comments wrote how he was freed from this music and grateful for the book and this other person says Dan is pompous?

This music that sounds like something I hear in the world and is played in church just does not add up as godly Christian music and the words don't count. "Jesus loves me" with a rock beat, two messages are going on here. There are two messages being brought forth instead of just one. The music and the words. If there is no balance in the music it becomes two messages. There has to be balance in music or it creates other feelings and sensation. I believe this book points out how many have left what should be holy and reverant in the Church. But, contemporary music has seeped into the churches over the years and created a new appetite for more of this kind of music. Rock and roll is an addiction and whether it comes from a contemporary rock and roll Christian band or worldly that appetite is still craving this music. Here is a quote: "He controlled us with the rock music."
-Surving Branch Davidian Cult Member. Another quote: "Nothing is more singular about this generation than its addiction to music"
Dr. Allan Bloom, from his book, "The Closing of the American Mind".

A much needed book for anyone who is willing to be open and take a look, seek God and find out from Him and be open at whatever the cost.
 

Write your own review about Why I Left Contemporary Christian Music Movement



Ask A Question or Provide Feedback regarding Why I Left Contemporary Christian Music Movement


Item Feedback and Product Questions
For immediate assistance call 888.395.0572 during the hours of 10am thru 8pm EST Monday thru Friday and a customer care representative will be happy to help you!

Help us continuously improve our service by reporting your feedback or questions below:

I have a question regarding this product
The information above is incorrect or conflicting
The page has misspellings or incorrect grammar
The page did not load correctly in my browser or created an error.

Email Address:
Anti Spam Question. To combat spammers we require that you answer a simple question.
What color is the sky?
Leave This Blank :
Do Not Change This Text :



Add This Product Widget To Your Website

Looking to add this information to your own website? Then use our Product Widget to allow you to display product information in a frame that is 120 pixels wide by 240 pixels high.

    Copy and paste the following HTML into your website and enjoy!



Order toll-free weekdays 10am thru 10pm EST by phone: 1-888-395-0572 (Lines are closed on holidays & weekends.)
Customer Service | My Account | Track My Orders | Return Policy | Request Free Catalog | Email Newsletter


Resources
Gift Certificates
RSS Feeds
Corporate
About Us
Contact Us
Policies
Terms Of Use
Privacy Policy