Newsletter   Secure Checkout   View Cart (0 items)  
Search:    Welcome Guest! Save up to 30-40% on most items with our awesome everyday discounts!

Joel and Obadiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library) [Hardcover]

By John Barton (Author)
Our Price $ 35.00  
Retail Value $ 50.00  
You Save $ 15.00  (30%)  
Item Number 154853  
Buy New $35.00
Quantity:
Available on the Internet only.

Old Testament Library - Full Series Preview
Image Title Price Stock Qty Add To Cart
  Leviticus   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Theology of the Old Testament (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Theology of the Old Testament: Volume II (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Daniel: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 24.50   In Stock  
  I & II Samuel: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Exile and Restoration (OTL) (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  Numbers: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  Judges (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah (Old Testament Library)   $ 28.00   In Stock  
  Old Testament Theology: The Theology of Israel's Traditions (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Old Testament Theology: The Theology of Israel's Prophetic Traditions (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  The Psalms: A Commentary (The Old Testament Library)   $ 49.00   In Stock  
  The Book of Job: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Micah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.60   In Stock  
  Joel and Obadiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 35.00   In Stock  
  Jewish Wisdom in the Hellenistic Age (Old Testament Library)   $ 35.00   In Stock  
  Isaiah (Old Testament Library)   $ 52.50   In Stock  
  Hosea: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 24.50   In Stock  
  Introduction to the Old Testament (OTL) (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Haggai and Zechariah 1-8 (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  Ezra-Nehemiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  Deuteronomy (OTL) (Old Testament Library)   $ 28.00   In Stock  
  Song of Songs (Old Testament Library)   $ 28.00   In Stock  
  Amos: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 24.50   In Stock  
  Isaiah 1-12 (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  OTL-Ecclesiastes (Old Testament Library)   $ 24.50   In Stock  
  OTL-Jonah   $ 21.00   In Stock  
  Proverbs (OTL) (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Esther (OTL] (Old Testament Library)   $ 24.50   In Stock  
  Deuteronomy (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Book of Exodus (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  OTL-Lamentations   $ 21.00   In Stock  
  MICAH (OTL) (Old Testament Library)   $ 21.00   In Stock  
  Judges: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 45.50   In Stock  
  Jeremiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 45.50   In Stock  
  Old Testament Theology, Volume One (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Old Testament Theology, Volume Two (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  Isaiah 13-39: a Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  OTL-Zechariah 9-14 & Malachi (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  Isaiah 40-66 (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  Joshua (Otl (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  A History of Israelite Religion in the Old Testament Period: Volume I: From the Beginnings to the End of the Monarchy   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  A History of Israelite Religion in the Old Testament Period: Volume II: From the Exile to the Maccabees   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  OTL The Book of Amos (Old Testament Library)   $ 24.50   In Stock  
  OTL-Ruth (Old Testament Library)   $ 21.00   In Stock  
  Genesis - A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 31.50   In Stock  
  OTL-Ezekiel (Old Testament Library)   $ 38.50   In Stock  
  First and Second Kings: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)   $ 45.50   In Stock  


Item description for Joel and Obadiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library) by John Barton...

Overview
In Joel and Obadiah, John Barton furnishes a fresh translation of the ancient manuscripts and discusses questions of historical background and literary architecture before providing a theologically sensitive and critically informed interpretation of the text. The Old Testament Library provides fresh and authoritative treatments of important aspects of Old Testament study through commentaries and general surveys. The contributors are scholars of international standing.

Publishers Description

In "Joel and Obadiah," John Barton furnishes a fresh translation of the ancient manuscripts and discusses questions of historical background and literary architecture before providing a theologically sensitive and critically informed interpretation of the text.

The Old Testament Library provides fresh and authoritative treatments of important aspects of Old Testament study through commentaries and general surveys. The contributors are scholars of international standing.

Promise Angels is dedicated to bringing you great books at great prices. Whether you read for entertainment, to learn, or for literacy - you will find what you want at promiseangels.com!

Item Specifications...


Studio: Westminster John Knox Press
Pages   168
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 9.09" Width: 6.13" Height: 0.8"
Weight:   0.8 lbs.
Binding  Hardcover
Release Date   Aug 26, 2014
Publisher   Westminster John Knox Press
Series  Old Testament Library  
ISBN  0664219667  
ISBN13  9780664219666  


Availability  88 units.
Availability accurate as of Mar 24, 2017 12:19.
Usually ships within one to two business days from La Vergne, TN.
Orders shipping to an address other than a confirmed Credit Card / Paypal Billing address may incur and additional processing delay.


More About John Barton


Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! John Barton is Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture, University of Oxford. His previous publications include What is the Bible?, People of the Book?, Love Unknown, The Oxford Bible Commentary and The Biblical World.

John Barton was born in 1948.

John Barton has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Cambridge Companions to Religion
  2. Old Testament Library
  3. Old Testament Theology
  4. Oxford Bible Commentary
  5. scm classics


Are You The Artisan or Author behind this product?
Improve our customers experience by registering for an Artisan Biography Center Homepage.



Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Commentaries > Old Testament
2Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Concordances
3Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > General
4Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Bible > Old Testament


Christian Product Categories
Books > Bible Study > Commentaries > General



Similar Products



Reviews - What do customers think about Joel and Obadiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)?

A Review of Barton's Treatment of Joel  Jan 29, 2008
Barton, J. (2001). Joel and Obadiah: A Comentary. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Know Press.

John Barton offers many insights into the text of Joel in this commentary. I will rehash some of his thoughts here and offer some of my own comments.

Barton suggests it as "reasonable" that the first half of Joel was dealing with a contemporary situation, whereas the second half is eschatological (p.27). Interestingly, though, Barton doesn't believe that the events discussed in the second half were imminent for the author. "...there is no particular reason to think the author of the second half also believed in the imminence of his expectation" (p. 29). Barton is contrasting the imminence of the first half versus what is considered to be a "determinism" in the second half, assuring that Yahweh will in fact act on behalf of His people. I would concur with Barton that the main theme of the second half of Joel (2:28-3:21) is mainly the concrete promise that Yahweh will intervene into the affairs of Judah, blessing them, saving them, and judging their enemies. At the same time, I wouldn't say that such was imminent or necessarily distant, but it is worth noting that the apocalyptic expectations in Israel's life often varied and reached a fever pitch when Jesus was born.

Barton commenting on Joel's concern in 2:28-3:21,
This is quite distinct from the concern of the so-called apocalyptic type of seer, who thought that the end time would be breaking in at any moment. It is focused on the reliability of God, not on any expectation of imminent intervention....It seems to me that the second half of Joel belongs more to the world of a concern for theodicy than of bated-breath expectations of imminent divine salvation for the righteous in Israel (p. 31).

Theodicy is primarily concerned with God's goodness and sovereignty. Joel is vindicating God's sovereignty and goodness by forth telling what is to come. The fact is that God is alive, powerful, and good...that He will act and be vindicated when everything is said and done. I would also say that the book of Revelation gives us much the same message, assuring persecuted Christians that God will act and vindicate Himself and His own on the last day.

Barton highlights the theme of God's mercy or "hesed" in the context of Joel (p. 32). God relents from the imposed plagues in response to the lament of His people. I presuppose that such a working of repentance and lament is a work of God's grace and thus shows that God loves to show mercy more so than showing judgment. I am personally a recipient of this steadfast love and am grateful that my fortunes have changed, that God has relented from His wrath towards me and has deflected it upon His very own Son, Jesus Christ.

While commenting on the impending judgment upon the nations, Barton views Joel's theology as "Israel centered". "...seeing foreigners as largely the enemies of Israel and hence of YHWH...(p.34)". T.B. Dozeman, however, suggests that Joel should be read within the corpus of the "Book of the Twelve", as noted by Barton (p. 35), and is tempered by God's compassion for Nineveh found in Jonah. It can thus be debated that Joel has some universalistic concerns, of which I am inclined to believe. The Spirit being outpoured on "all flesh" and salvation provided for all who call upon the name of the Lord both serve as themes which can certainly expand beyond Israel.

Barton considers possible scenarios on how best to understand Joel. Some have suggested that Joel may be a genre of "theodicy" and not prophecy at all, and for those who view Joel as prophetic are not unanimous on what aspects of Joel are past, contemporary, or future. Barton quotes on Joel 2:18,
"Then the LORD became jealous for his land"--when? When the people did as the prophet told them? Or when the prophet had delivered his message? Or even within the prophetic vision--so that the narrative account is simply another part of what the prophet is predicting? The last possibility cannot be ruled out; everything in the book, including the narrative about YHWH's having pity on the people, could be taking place within the prophetic vision and might not refer to events that actually occurred in the external world (p. 87).

When dealing with the transition that occurs in Joel, starting with 2:28, Barton suggests that it is an addition to an already completed work, "...I believe it is safe to conclude here that the oracle is an addition to an already completed work" (p. 94). While I may disagree with his assessment, I am agreed on his intent to determine what to make of the text in its original context. Barton suggests two possible effects of the outpoured Spirit, "First, it may be seen as the means by which dead flesh is transformed into living beings....But the second effect...is to communicate the power of YHWH...empowering them to do great deeds" (p. 95).

Regarding the text "all flesh", it has been suggested by commentators that it is restricted to Israel alone, while others have pointed out that nowhere else in scripture does "all flesh" refer restrictively to Israel, but rather inclusive of all humans. Barton draws attention to Rabbinic eschatology, in that the "signs of the end" would be marked by a "gathering in of the Gentiles" (p. 96). The usage of this text by the Apostle Peter on Pentecost certainly validates the idea that an existing tradition viewed God's actions in the "last days" as having global significance.

Barton's comments on the "portents" in 2:30 and judgment on the nations in 3:1-3 suggest that such needn't be understood chronologically,
It does not seem probable that the "portents" here are meant to follow the outpouring of the spirit in 2:28-29--nor to precede them, for that matter. We simply have another fragmentary prophecy of the end time, which cannot be arranged with others into a chronological sequence (p. 97).

On the judgment of the nations, he adds,
Once again, it makes little sense to ask how this act of judgment fits in with the outpouring of the spirit or the portents of 2:30-32; it is simply another eschatological theme only loosely connected to anything else (p. 99).

Perhaps, I am excercising what I think to be common sense, but it seems obvious that the Spirit's outpouring, signs, and eventual judgment upon all the nations do have chronological significance and are far more than "loosely connected". Joel 2:32 promises escape for all who call upon the name of YHWH, and I believe that this promised safety is from the coming universal judgment upon all the nations. These themes connect in a very crucial way.

I appreciate Barton's contribution in this volume, but feels that he raises more questions than he answers. Where Barton does answer questions, I am inclined to disagree with his conclusions more often I have with other commentators. His vast knowledge of existing scholarship is not to be questioned for he cites much that shows a broad awareness of the existing scholarship on which he speaks.
 

Write your own review about Joel and Obadiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)



Ask A Question or Provide Feedback regarding Joel and Obadiah: A Commentary (Old Testament Library)


Item Feedback and Product Questions
For immediate assistance call 888.395.0572 during the hours of 10am thru 8pm EST Monday thru Friday and a customer care representative will be happy to help you!

Help us continuously improve our service by reporting your feedback or questions below:

I have a question regarding this product
The information above is incorrect or conflicting
The page has misspellings or incorrect grammar
The page did not load correctly in my browser or created an error.

Email Address:
Anti Spam Question. To combat spammers we require that you answer a simple question.
What color is the sky?
Leave This Blank :
Do Not Change This Text :



Add This Product Widget To Your Website

Looking to add this information to your own website? Then use our Product Widget to allow you to display product information in a frame that is 120 pixels wide by 240 pixels high.

    Copy and paste the following HTML into your website and enjoy!



Order toll-free weekdays 10am thru 10pm EST by phone: 1-888-395-0572 (Lines are closed on holidays & weekends.)
Customer Service | My Account | Track My Orders | Return Policy | Request Free Catalog | Email Newsletter


Resources
Gift Certificates
RSS Feeds
Corporate
About Us
Contact Us
Policies
Terms Of Use
Privacy Policy