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Les Bijoux de la Castafiore (Tintin) [Hardcover]

By Herge
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Item description for Les Bijoux de la Castafiore (Tintin) by Herge...

Les Bijoux de la Castafiore (Tintin) by Herge

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Item Specifications...


Pages   61
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 0.25" Width: 8.75" Height: 11.5"
Weight:   0.95 lbs.
Binding  Hardcover
Publisher   Casterman Editions
ISBN  2203001208  
ISBN13  9782203001206  


Availability  30 units.
Availability accurate as of May 30, 2017 07:39.
Usually ships within one to two business days from La Vergne, TN.
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More About Herge


Herge Georges Remi was born in Brussels, Belgium, in 1907.

Although he would go on to be one of the world’s most iconic cartoonists, Georges was not a particularly standout student as a young boy. Instead, he preferred to indulge in his love for adventure and games with his friends on the streets of Brussels. In secondary school, he joined the Boy Scouts. His drawing skills quickly caught the attention of the Scout leaders, and it wasn’t long before he was illustrating a Scout magazine and creating his first characters.

It was around this time that he decided to take the pen name “Hergé,” the French pronunciation of his initials in reverse. Georges left school at age 17 and eventually got a job helping create the children’s pages of a daily newspaper, Le Vingtième Siècle.

Hergé first drew Tintin in Le Petit Vingtième (the children’s pages of Le Vingtième Siècle) in 1929. The little reporter was an instant success in Belgium and beyond. By the 1950s, the Tintin adventures had become so popular that Hergé set up Studios Hergé. This not only supplied Hergé with a team of assistants and artists to expand the Tintin universe, it also freed him to do in-depth research for his stories, many of which took his characters to places that Hergé — and his devoted readers — had never seen.

Although Tintin traveled around the world, Hergé stayed in Belgium for most of his life. In his later years, the artist and author managed to make trips to several countries and see firsthand the places that inspired Tintin’s exciting adventures.

Herge was born in 1907 and died in 1983.

Herge has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Adventures of Tintin (Paperback)
  2. His the Adventures of Tintin
  3. Tintin
  4. Tintin Three-In-One
  5. Tintin Young Readers Editions


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Product Categories

1Books > Foreign Language Books > French
2Books > Subjects > Arts & Photography > Graphic Design > Drawing > General
3Books > Subjects > Children > Authors & Illustrators, A-Z > ( H ) > Herge
4Books > Subjects > Children > Literature > Action & Adventure
5Books > Subjects > Children > Literature > Science Fiction, Fantasy, Mystery & Horror > Children's Comics
6Books > Subjects > Children > Literature > Science Fiction, Fantasy, Mystery & Horror > Mysteries, Espionage, & Detectives
7Books > Subjects > Children > Series > Humorous > TinTin
8Books > Subjects > Comics & Graphic Novels > Comic Strips > General
9Books > Subjects > Comics & Graphic Novels > General
10Books > Subjects > Comics & Graphic Novels > Graphic Novels > General
11Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > General > Contemporary
12Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > General
13Books > Subjects > Reference > Foreign Languages > General



Reviews - What do customers think about Les Bijoux de la Castafiore (Tintin)?

Madame Castafiore descends upon Captain Haddock's home  May 24, 2003
I have to admit that after going to the Moon and rescuing his friend Chang in Tibet, the stay at home Tintin adventure "Les Bijoux de la Castafiore" ("The Castafiore Emerald") is relatively tame. It begins with Tintin and Captain Haddock out for a walk and discovering a band of gypsies camped near the rubbish dump. This offends the good captain, who offers the gypsies the use of a large meadow near his hall. However, no good deed goes unpunished and he receives a telegram announcing the imminent arrival of Bianca Castafiore, the Milanese Nightingale. Meanwhile, the broken step on the front staircase earns Haddock a badly sprained ankle and the opportunity to roll around the adventure in a wheelchair. The diva and her entourage then descend upon the hall, literally adding insult to injury by giving the captain the gift of a parrot.

As Castafiore repeatedly points out, she has brought along her jewels, including an emerald given the signora by the Maharajah of Gopal. The gypsy fortuneteller had already predicted the theft of the jewels and we expect her prophecy to come true, even though Castafiore is constantly yelling about her jewels missing. But you know that sooner or later this is going to come to pass and then it will be up to our intrepid reporter to solve the case and save the day. Meanwhile, Captain Haddock's life continues to be a string of minor misfortunes and misunderstands thanks to Castafiore, Professor Tournesol, the parrot, Dupont and Dupond, and the unwillingness of the local repairman to come out and fix that step.

"Les Bijoux de la Castafiore" derives its comedy from the clash of characters with Tintin staying out of the way for the most part. Of course, by this time in the series Hergé is completely comfortable with his cast of characters, which shows in the interplay, although I admit the diva is not my cup of tea. I just happen to really like the way Hergé represents other lands, so having him stay around the captain's house just seems to me to be an interlude from the main adventures. Still, "Les Bijoux de la Castafiore" is well worth the read Hergé does a delightful take on that new fangled invention, the television. Final Note: I like Hergé's quaint cover, with Castafiore singing for the cameras while a smiling Tintin reminds us to be quiet during the performance.

 
The Castafiore Emerald  Jul 3, 2000
This is probably the least well known and appreciated of Tintin's adventures. Tintin and Captain Haddock receive a visit from the overbearing opera singer/diva Bianca Castafiore. Many humorous incidents ensue as Bianca is hounded by the press and ends up losing her fabulous emerald. The situation is complicated by the arrival of gypsies to Captain Haddock's home whose presence arises suspicion over the disappearance of Bianca's jewels.

This is the only Tintin adventure where Tintin does not journey to distant lands for his adventures - the action is all sentenced around his home. As a result there is not the normal pace and excitment normally present in Tintin and perhaps this is why the book is not so popular with younger readers. However the story is still excellent in a more subtle way. Firstly the handling of the gypsies in the book is very sensitive and not prejudiced which is certainly not in keeping with the period in which the book was written. The gypsies are not depicted as a band of thieving rogues but a group of people abandoned by all sections of society. Herge plays very well on the inherent prejudices of the characters of the book very well throughout to give the gypsies a sympathetic representation. In this respect the book is excellent for young children since it will give them a broader view of the many peoples of the world. Secondly the subject of press intrusion is dealt with very well throughout the book. The visiting opera singer Bianca Castafiore is followed by journalists and her equivocal attitude to the press is hilarious - she embraces one magasine yet hates another simply because she didn't like one of the pictures of her which was published in it. Then of course there is the actual mystery of the emerald. Unlike other Tintin books the main theme seems to be fairly trifling and merely a source of continuity for the book. The reader is not engaged by the emerald's disappearance and in the end the thief turns out to be ..... (I won't spoil it). The illustrations in the book are particularly detailed and lush. This was Herge's ninteenth Tintin book and thus his style is established and refined as are his racial prejudices. In fact by now Herge was a champion of the anti-racism cause.

The Castafiore Emerald is probably one of Herge's most mature works. Although there is a story, this is inconsequential when compared to the other racial and political issues and the rich characters. Because of this fact the book would probably not be so engaging for younger readers but would certainly be diverting for older children and indeed educational in many ways.

 
The Castafiore Emerald  Jul 3, 2000
This is probably the least well known and appreciated of Tintin's adventures. Tintin and Captain Haddock receive a visit from the overbearing opera singer/diva Bianca Castafiore. Many humorous incidents ensue as Bianca is hounded by the press and ends up losing her fabulous emerald. The situation is complicated by the arrival of gypsies to Captain Haddock's home whose presence arises suspicion over the disappearance of Bianca's jewels.

This is the only Tintin adventure where Tintin does not journey to distant lands for his adventures - the action is all sentenced around his home. As a result there is not the normal pace and excitment normally present in Tintin and perhaps this is why the book is not so popular with younger readers. However the story is still excellent in a more subtle way. Firstly the handling of the gypsies in the book is very sensitive and not prejudiced which is certainly not in keeping with the period in which the book was written. The gypsies are not depicted as a band of thieving rogues but a group of people abandoned by all sections of society. Herge plays very well on the inherent prejudices of the characters of the book very well throughout to give the gypsies a sympathetic representation. In this respect the book is excellent for young children since it will give them a broader view of the many peoples of the world. Secondly the subject of press intrusion is dealt with very well throughout the book. The visiting opera singer Bianca Castafiore is followed by journalists and her equivocal attitude to the press is hilarious - she embraces one magasine yet hates another simply because she didn't like one of the pictures of her which was published in it. Then of course there is the actual mystery of the emerald. Unlike other Tintin books the main theme seems to be fairly trifling and merely a source of continuity for the book. The reader is not engaged by the emerald's disappearance and in the end the thief turns out to be ..... (I won't spoil it). The illustrations in the book are particularly detailed and lush. This was Herge's ninteenth Tintin book and thus his style is established and refined as are his racial prejudices. In fact by now Herge was a champion of the anti-racism cause.

The Castafiore Emerald is probably one of Herge's most mature works. Although there is a story, this is inconsequential when compared to the other racial and political issues and the rich characters. Because of this fact the book would probably not be so engaging for younger readers but would certainly be diverting for older children and indeed educational in many ways.

 
Another Herge masterpiece  Jul 3, 2000
This is a classic chapter in Tintin's life - or more to the point: Captain Haddock's life, for his relationship with Castafiore is explored over the main plot - a mystery surrounding her lost jewels. The artwork is, as always, superb and the subtleties endless. The disillusioned accompanist is a great touch, and we can share the Haddock's discomfort at having to spend countless days in his once peaceful abode, at the mercy of Castafiore's shrill voice. It's great to go back to the original French versions - though the English translations are fine, noone can fully replicate the original intention of Herge, the master.
 

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