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Her Father's Daughter (Dodo Press) [Paperback]

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Item description for Her Father's Daughter (Dodo Press) by Gene Stratton Porter...

Large format paper back for easy reading. Fanciful, romance with an intricate plot set in the American Midwest



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Item Specifications...


Pages   364
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 8.98" Width: 5.98" Height: 1.1"
Weight:   1.19 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Jun 30, 2005
Publisher   Dodo Press
ISBN  1905432259  
ISBN13  9781905432257  


Availability  0 units.


More About Gene Stratton Porter


Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Gene Stratton-Porter (1863 -1924) was an American author, amateur naturalist, wildlife photographer, and one of the earliest women to form a movie studio and production company. She wrote some best-selling novels and well-received columns in national magazines, such as McCalls. Her works were translated into several languages, including Braille, and Stratton-Porter was estimated to have 50 million readers around the world. She used her position and income as a well-known author to support conservation of Limberlost Swamp and other wetlands in the state of Indiana. Her novel A Girl of the Limberlost was adapted four times as a film, most recently in 1990 in a made-for-TV version.

Gene Stratton-Porter was born in 1863 and died in 1924.

Gene Stratton-Porter has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Dover Storybooks for Children
  2. Library of Indiana Classics (Paperback)


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Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Romance > Contemporary > General
2Books > Subjects > Romance > General



Reviews - What do customers think about Her Father's Daughter (Dodo Press)?

Cover Illustration All Wrong  Jan 29, 2008
For whatever reason, Dodo Press has chosen a cover illustration for this book that is completely out of period. The book itself is flawed by the anti-Asian bias of the time, but wonderful in the descriptions of nature in California before it was overpopulated. The plot is idealistic; Gene Stratton-Porter said in an article that she believed in describing the best of people, rather than the worst.
 
2 1/2 stars--Good story, shocking undercurrent  Jul 12, 2007
If only Gene Stratton-Porter could have developed this story properly, without using it as a vehicle for racist ideas. I understand that WWI was devastating and the time after the war was shaky and uncertain--a whole way of life was gone--and if she had only expressed her fear of being taken over by another country, we maybe could cut her some slack. She does express fear that verges on hysteria. But she goes much further and states that all 'colored' people are inferior to the white races who have been the ruling race so far. Um, what about the Egyptians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans? (Are Greeks and Romans white or persons of color?) Then there's ancient China and India. She also implies that only whites are made in God's image. And then to kill a 'Jap' with no remorse on the part of the killer and accomplice? The worst part about it is that this was a children's book and who knows how many children have read it from the 1920's on. Strangely, toward the end of the book she makes a speech praising Native Americans and the damage our civilization did to them. Oh, well, whoever said racism was rational?

But, if you can somehow ignore all that (or, well, at least be prepared for it), the story is typical GSP but not quite fleshed out as it should be: well written, engaging, with a lovable heroine and beautiful descriptions of nature. I enjoyed the recipes using native plants. Just don't let your children read it.
 
Low ratings from a GSP fan  Dec 2, 2005
I read this as a kid, and I was dismayed. The concept of the "Yellow Peril" was rampant at the time of authorship, so I shouldn't have been shocked. The story was mediocre compared to some of Stratton Porter's other work (the Harvester was awesome, and a Girl of the Limberlost, Keeper of the Bees, etc. are good reads, too.) I can only say that it was educational to be able to read something by an author that I admired and see that it was so obviously racist. Take a look at her other works, and don't judge her by this one, but be prepared if you decide to read this.
 
Her father's disaster  Jul 30, 2005
In every author's bibliography, there's usually at least one dud. Usually it's due to lackluster plot or writing, but Gene Stratton-Porter's disastrous "Her Father's Daughter" collapses under the weight of relentless racism. Good luck reading this one without getting mad.

Linda Strong is the younger of two orphaned girls, but she's the "Cinderella" -- she has virtually no clothes, a tiny room, and is viewed as a tomboyish annoyance by her dainty sister Eileen, who uses most of the money for her own clothes, cosmetics and room. Despite this, she captures the heart of school hottie Donald, and entertains Eileen's male admirers.

But Linda finally gets tired of living under Eileen's heel, and discovers that her late father's books are still bringing in royalties. With those and his old car, she begins a career as a nature writer. But even this new level of independence can't prepare Linda for what happens when her best friend Marion loses an important competition -- and when Eileen leaves, and her true parentage is revealed.

None of that plotline is really a problem, although it's glaringly obvious from the start that Eileen and Linda are not really sisters. While it's hardly an original plot, Linda's movements toward independence are a unusual and rather refreshing, even if she does talk out loud to herself a lot.

The storylines about Eileen's engagement and Marion's attempts to become an architect are also fairly entertaining, and show the differences between the traditional parlor flower and career women. And as she did in "Girl of the Limberlost," Stratton-Porter brings the wild places of California to life as Linda hunts for wildlife and plants in the hills.

The problem? Racism. A subplot runs under the story of Donald and Linda, where a Japanese immigrant is outstripping Donald scholastically. Stratton-Porter repeatedly states that she considered this unacceptable. As a final insult, she has the immigrant cheating -- implying that not only did she think it's unacceptable, but impossible. I wonder what Ms. Stratton-Porter would think of international test results now.

That racist current also ruins the portrait of Linda as an intelligent, mature young woman. Her rantings about Caucasian dominance are maddening, as is one scene where she gets creative with paints and "fashioned huge storm clouds wind driven, that floated in such a manner as to bring the merest suggestionof menacing faces, black faces, yellow faces, brown faces." A few of the supporting characters like tragic Marion are interesting, but Linda's poisonous attitude pretty much wrecks it all.

The bare bones hint at a fun "Cinderella" sort of novel, but Gene Stratton-Porter's vitriolic attitude corrodes it to the point where you can't even skim past the bad bits.
 
Her father's disaster  May 3, 2005
In every author's bibliography, there's usually at least one dud. Usually it's due to lackluster plot or writing, but Gene Stratton-Porter's disastrous "Her Father's Daughter" collapses under the weight of relentless racism. Good luck reading this one without getting mad.

Linda Strong is the younger of two orphaned girls, but she's the "Cinderella" -- she has virtually no clothes, a tiny room, and is viewed as a tomboyish annoyance by her dainty sister Eileen, who uses most of the money for her own clothes, cosmetics and room. Despite this, she captures the heart of school hottie Donald, and entertains Eileen's male admirers.

But Linda finally gets tired of living under Eileen's heel, and discovers that her late father's books are still bringing in royalties. With those and his old car, she begins a career as a nature writer. But even this new level of independence can't prepare Linda for what happens when her best friend Marion loses an important competition -- and when Eileen leaves, and her true parentage is revealed.

None of that plotline is really a problem, although it's glaringly obvious from the start that Eileen and Linda are not really sisters. While it's hardly an original plot, Linda's movements toward independence are a unusual and rather refreshing, even if she does talk out loud to herself a lot.

The storylines about Eileen's engagement and Marion's attempts to become an architect are also fairly entertaining, and show the differences between the traditional parlor flower and career women. And as she did in "Girl of the Limberlost," Stratton-Porter brings the wild places of California to life as Linda hunts for wildlife and plants in the hills.

The problem? Racism. A subplot runs under the story of Donald and Linda, where a Japanese immigrant is outstripping Donald scholastically. Stratton-Porter repeatedly states that she considered this unacceptable. As a final insult, she has the immigrant cheating -- implying that not only did she think it's unacceptable, but impossible. I wonder what Ms. Stratton-Porter would think of international test results now.

That racist current also ruins the portrait of Linda as an intelligent, mature young woman. Her rantings about Caucasian dominance are maddening, as is one scene where she gets creative with paints and "fashioned huge storm clouds wind driven, that floated in such a manner as to bring the merest suggestionof menacing faces, black faces, yellow faces, brown faces." A few of the supporting characters like tragic Marion are interesting, but Linda's poisonous attitude pretty much wrecks it all.

The bare bones hint at a fun "Cinderella" sort of novel, but Gene Stratton-Porter's vitriolic attitude corrodes it to the point where you can't even skim past the bad bits.
 

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