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Amos Fortune, Free Man (Newbery Library, Puffin) [Paperback]

By Elizabeth Yates (Author)
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Item description for Amos Fortune, Free Man (Newbery Library, Puffin) by Elizabeth Yates...

The life of the eighteenth-century African prince who, after being captured by slave traders, was brought to Massachusetts where he was a slave until he was able to buy his freedom at the age of sixty.

Publishers Description
Winner of the Newbery Medal
When Amos Fortune was only fifteen years old, he was captured by slave traders and brought to Massachusetts, where he was sold at auction. Although his freedom had been taken, Amos never lost his dinity and courage. For 45 years, Amos worked as a slave and dreamed of freedom. And, at age 60, he finally began to see those dreams come true.
"The moving story of a life dedicated to the fight for freedom."--Booklist

Awards and Recognitions
Amos Fortune, Free Man (Newbery Library, Puffin) by Elizabeth Yates has received the following awards and recognitions -
  • Newbery Medal - 1951 Winner - Children's category

Citations And Professional Reviews
Amos Fortune, Free Man (Newbery Library, Puffin) by Elizabeth Yates has been reviewed by professional book reviewers and journalists at the following establishments -
  • Wilson Middle/Junior Hi Catalo - 01/01/2009 page 562
  • Wilson Children's Catalog - 01/01/1991 page 385
  • Wilson Middle/Junior Hi Catalo - 01/01/2000 page 324
  • Wilson Children's Catalog - 01/01/2001 page 350
  • Wilson Middle/Junior Hi Catalo - 01/01/2005 page 403
  • Wilson Children's Catalog - 01/01/2006 page 497

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Item Specifications...

Studio: Puffin
Pages   181
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 7.83" Width: 5.13" Height: 0.51"
Weight:   0.4 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Feb 8, 2002
Publisher   Penguin Group USA
Age  8-12
Series  Puffin Newberry Library  
ISBN  0140341587  
ISBN13  9780140341584  

Availability  537 units.
Availability accurate as of Oct 25, 2016 06:51.
Usually ships within one to two business days from La Vergne, TN.
Orders shipping to an address other than a confirmed Credit Card / Paypal Billing address may incur and additional processing delay.

More About Elizabeth Yates

Register your artisan biography and upload your photo! Elizabeth Yates (1905 2001), prolific American author, won the 1951 Newbery Medal for her novel Amos Fortune, Free Man. She also received a Newbery Honor in 1944 for Mountain Born.
Nora Unwin (1907 1982) illustrated more than one hundred books for children."

Elizabeth Yates lived in Concord, in the state of New Hampshire. Elizabeth Yates was born in 1905 and died in 2001.

Elizabeth Yates has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Light Line
  2. Pennant
  3. Puffin Newberry Library

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Improve our customers experience by registering for an Artisan Biography Center Homepage.

Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Children > Ages 9-12 > General
2Books > Subjects > Children > History & Historical Fiction > United States > General
3Books > Subjects > Children > People & Places > Biographies > Historical
4Books > Subjects > Children > People & Places > Biographies > People of Color
5Books > Subjects > Children > People & Places > Multicultural Stories > African-American
6Books > Subjects > Nonfiction > Education > Homeschooling > General
7Books > Subjects > Teens > Biographies & Memoirs > General
8Books > Subjects > Teens > Biographies & Memoirs > Biographies
9Books > Subjects > Teens > History & Historical Fiction > Historical Fiction

Christian Product Categories
Books > Education (K-12) > General Education > General
Books > Inspiration > Motivation > Biography & Autobiography

Homeschool Catalog Product Categories
Books > Homeschool > Reading & Character Building > Biographies

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Reviews - What do customers think about Amos Fortune, Free Man (Newbery Library, Puffin)?

Excellent vocabulary resource!  Jul 27, 2007
I've used Amos Fortune Free Man as a powerful tool in building vocabulary and dictionary usage skills for my fifth graders. It is not an easy read, but does open young eyes to the way of life in colonial America. The book develops the character as they read, and I point that out to my students. Advanced readers told me that they thought it was boring at first but got better as they read. The concept that fiction and historical fiction books often develop in that way came through clearer by having them read the book than by my merely telling them. They learned not to give up on a book after reading just a few pages. I highly recommend it for gifted readers.
Understanding Freedom  Mar 19, 2007

Do you forget how vital freedom is in everyday life? Elizabeth Yates, the author of Amos Fortune: Free Man, informs her readers of how important freedom is. Atamun, the protagonist, was a representation for all of those Africans who struggled up the steep road, full of obstacles, to freedom. He stood for a large mistreated group of Africans who were deprived of their freedom and forced to work against their will.
The central theme of freedom began with the concept of slavery. Atamun, who represents all the Africans who were once free in their own continent, was a prince in Africa until he was captured. All along the perilous and excruciating voyage, Atamun wished for freedom. He wanted to be back in Africa. Africa was a place where he did not need to earn freedom. However, the pain of the voyage was a constant reminder that snickered, "You cannot escape without receiving more pain and suffering."
At last, the voyage ended and Atamun's trials had just begun. He refused to listen to the embarrassing words that echoed from the mouths of those who wished to force him deeper still into the pit of slavery. The Europeans tried to do so by selling Atamun to other Europeans so he would have to work for them. In addition, the Europeans who wanted to buy him insulted Atamun by laughing at his looks and inability to speak English. Atamun was finally bought by a Quaker. He was re-named Amos, but I have chosen to call him Atamun because Atamun was his original African name. The pain of being owned weakened Atamun physically and mentally. Like most slaves, Atamun was re-sold to someone else. Fortunately, he was freed quickly. The burden of being a slave was removed but was quickly replaced with new hardships.
Bigotry and injustice seeped into Atamun's life at different times like poison because his lack of liberty was due to his color. Once, Atamun needed land. He had earned enough money to free his own family. Now, he wanted to expand their lives by giving them land. There was plenty of land, which Atamun discovered in a spacious settlement. The constable of that settlement, however, stood against him. Thankfully, the constable finally agreed. Atamun was lent a large plot of land.
Having journeyed far in his life and gotten past two obstacles, Atamun was proud of himself. However, Atamun did not have the power to do certain things. Atamun reached other obstacles, such as want for land of his own and lack of business. Atamun received business once his reputation as a tanner grew, but Atamun's color caused limitations. At that time, Atamun was unable to sit anywhere other than the back pew at church or to be paid the proper amount of money. He, however, did raise enough money to buy his own plot of land. Atamun reached a final obstacle. What was he going to do about others who were kept down by slavery? Atamun decided to help others by funding the school for Africans in his settlement. Atamun had fulfilled the dream of the slave. Atamun was truly free in his heart, mind, and spirit!
Freedom is a blessing that makes everyone's life better, but most people do not consider its magnitude every day because they have liberty in abundance. Elizabeth Yates did an excellent job of informing you that freedom is essential for a peaceful life and how horrible life can be without it.
What A Great Book To Read   Nov 30, 2006
Amos Fortune Free Man is one of the best books I have ever read. Amos Fortune is a biography,So he really lived. I personally love to read biographies whether it's sports or history. Amos was from an African tribe, but slave traders came over to Africa. Amos even though he lives in a different country is trying to save his people. This book can make you wonder why something happened or did not happen. This book was so good that I had to read it for an second time. All the biography lovers out there need to read this book. Also this book can get a little boring sometimes, but it's still a good book!If I get another chance to read this book I definitely will.
More Boring Than I Thought  Nov 1, 2006
As with most other kids I thought this book was not worth writing. While reading the description it sounded fantasticly exciting. In the beginning it actually sounded like an interesting piece of history. By the end it was one of the most boring books I've ever read. Now I have come to realize that just because a book wins the Newbery Medal does not mean that it is a good book. With 1,000 good books one book can be published because it is pollitically correct or is spewed out by a good author. I have no doubts about Elizabeth Yates but I think that Amos Fortune is a book about a man that had a good life, but one that was not nessicarily worth writing about.
Not so boring.  Apr 14, 2006
Quite contrary to other peoples opinions on this book I found it engaging rather than boring. The main character (Amos) is an example good of patience. It is well written and an excellent book.

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