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Item description for Paradise by Dante Alighieri & Heathcote Williams...

The Divine Comedy is a complete scale of the depths and heights of human emotion," wrote T.S. Eliot."The last canto of the Paradiso is to my thinking the highest point that poetry has ever reached or ever can reach."

The Divine Comedy stands as one of the towering creations of world literature, and its climactic section, the Paradiso, is perhaps the most ambitious poetic attempt ever made to represent the merging of individual destiny with universal order.Having passed through Hell and Purgatory, Dante is led by his beloved Beatrice to the upper sphere of Paradise, wherein lie the sublime truths of Divine will and eternal salvation, to at last experience a rapturous vision of God.

"A spectacular achievement," said poet and critic Archibald MacLeish of John Ciardi's version of Dante's masterpiece."A text with the clarity and sobriety of a first-rate prose translation which at the same time suggests in powerful and unmistakable ways the run and rhythm of the great original."

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Item Specifications...

Format: Audiobook,   Unabridged
Studio: Naxos Audiobooks
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 1" Width: 5.5" Height: 4.75"
Weight:   0.5 lbs.
Binding  CD
Release Date   Feb 28, 2005
Publisher   Naxos Audiobooks
ISBN  9626343184  
ISBN13  9789626343180  

Availability  0 units.

More About Dante Alighieri & Heathcote Williams

Dante Alighieri Durante degli Alighieri, simply referred to as Dante (1265–1321), was a major Italian poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy, originally called La Comedia and later called Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature.

In Italy he is known as il Sommo Poeta ("the Supreme Poet") or just il Poeta. He, Petrarch and Boccaccio are also known as "the three fountains" or "the three crowns". Dante is also called the "Father of the Italian language".

He entered into Florentine politics in 1295, but he and his party were forced into exile in a hostile political climate in 1301. Taking asylum in Ravenna late in life, Dante completed his Divine Commedia, considered one of the most important works of Western literature, before his death in 1321.

Dante Alighieri was born in 1265 and died in 1321.

Dante Alighieri has published or released items in the following series...
  1. Alba
  2. Bantam Classics
  3. Barnes & Noble Classics
  4. Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy
  5. Dante's Divine Comedy
  6. Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri
  7. Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri
  8. Dover Thrift Editions
  9. Enriched Classics
  10. Galaxy Books
  11. Indiana Masterpiece Editions
  12. Inferno (Hell)
  13. Modern Library Classics (Paperback)
  14. New Verse Translation by Michael Palma
  15. Oxford World's Classics (Paperback)
  16. Penguin Classics
  17. Signet Classics
  18. Word Cloud Classics

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Product Categories

1Books > Audio CDs > Literature & Fiction > Drama
2Books > Audio CDs > Literature & Fiction > Poetry
3Books > Audio CDs > Poetry & Drama
4Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > Authors, A-Z > ( A ) > Alighieri, Dante
5Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > Drama
6Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > Poetry > General

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Reviews - What do customers think about Paradise?

Medieval vision of the afterlife  Apr 30, 2007
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
"The Divine Comedy" describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman epic poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and another of his works, "La Vita Nuova." While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand. Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).

Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect. By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian. In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante. Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity). This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.

Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy". In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature. Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good. By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.

The Divine Comedy can be described simply as an allegory: Each canto, and the episodes therein, can contain many alternate meanings. Dante's allegory, however, is more complex, and, in explaining how to read the poem (see the "Letter to Can Grande della Scala"), he outlines other levels of meaning besides the allegory (the historical, the moral, the literal, and the anagogical). The structure of the poem, likewise, is quite complex, with mathematical and numerological patterns arching throughout the work, particularly threes and nines. The poem is often lauded for its particularly human qualities: Dante's skillful delineation of the characters he encounters in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise; his bitter denunciations of Florentine and Italian politics; and his powerful poetic imagination. Dante's use of real characters, according to Dorothy Sayers in her introduction to her translation of "L'Inferno", allows Dante the freedom of not having to involve the reader in description, and allows him to "[make] room in his poem for the discussion of a great many subjects of the utmost importance, thus widening its range and increasing its variety."

Dante called the poem "Comedy" (the adjective "Divine" added later in the 16th century) because poems in the ancient world were classified as High ("Tragedy") or Low ("Comedy"). Low poems had happy endings and were of everyday or vulgar subjects, while High poems were for more serious matters. Dante was one of the first in the Middle Ages to write of a serious subject, the Redemption of man, in the low and vulgar Italian language and not the Latin language as one might expect for such a serious topic.

After an initial ascension (Canto I), Beatrice guides Dante through the nine spheres of Heaven. These are concentric and spherical, similar to Aristotelian and Ptolemaic cosmology. Dante admits that the vision of heaven he receives is the one that his human eyes permit him to see. Thus, the vision of heaven found in the Cantos is Dante's own personal vision, ambiguous in its true construction. The addition of a moral dimension means that a soul that has reached Paradise stops at the level applicable to it. Souls are allotted to the point of heaven that fits with their human ability to love God. Thus, there is a heavenly hierarchy. All parts of heaven are accessible to the heavenly soul. That is to say all experience God but there is a hierarchy in the sense that some souls are more spiritually developed than others. This is not determined by time or learning as such but by their proximity to God (how much they allow themselves to experience him above other things). It must be remembered in Dante's schema that all souls in Heaven are on some level always in contact with God.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
Great translation  Jan 4, 2007
I haven't read Esolen's Inferno, but his translation of Purgatory was superb--not just the translation itself but the notes, which I'm fairly certain Esolen wrote. After translating the Inferno, the Purgatory, and then the Paradise, Esolen was stimulated to write a magnificent interpretative introduction to the Paradise which is one of the best pieces I've ever read on Dante.

Esolen's Introduction to the Paradise ranks with Erich Auerbach's essays on Dante in Mimesis and Scenes from the Drama of European Literature, and I prefer it to T. S. Eliot's famous essay on Dante; it is a classic. Esolen's introduction to the Paradise in this edition is alone worth the price of the book, and I would characterise it as a must-read for anyone interested in Dante and his Comedy.

As with the previous volumes of the Comedy, in the Paradise Esolen again proves himself to be a sensitive and judicious translator, and the notes are again excellent.

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