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A Guide to Biblical Hebrew Syntax [Paperback]

By Bill T. Arnold (Author) & John H. Choi (Author)
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Item description for A Guide to Biblical Hebrew Syntax by Bill T. Arnold & John H. Choi...

This introduces and abridges the syntactical features of the original language of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. Scholars have made significant progress in recent decades in understanding Biblical Hebrew syntax. Yet intermediate readers seldom have access to this progress due to the technical jargon and sometimes-obscure locations of the scholarly publications. This Guide is an intermediate-level reference grammar for Biblical Hebrew. As such, it assumes an understanding of elementary phonology and morphology, and defines and illustrates the fundamental syntactical features of Biblical Hebrew that most intermediate-level readers struggle to master. The volume divides Biblical Hebrew syntax, and to a lesser extent morphology, into four parts. The first three cover the individual words (nouns, verbs, and particles) with the goal of helping the reader move from morphological and syntactical observations to meaning and significance. The fourth section moves beyond phase-level phenomena and considers the larger relationships of clauses and sentences.

  • Richly illustrated with examples drawn directly from the Hebrew Bible, translated immediately for quick reference
  • Provides in-depth treatment of syntactical issues for the intermediate reader
  • Includes a glossary of all grammatical and linguistic terms, for easy reference

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    Item Specifications...

    Studio: Cambridge University Press
    Pages   228
    Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 8.4" Width: 5.5" Height: 0.6"
    Weight:   0.75 lbs.
    Binding  Softcover
    Release Date   Nov 24, 2003
    Publisher   Cambridge University Press
    Edition  New  
    ISBN  0521533481  
    ISBN13  9780521533485  

    Availability  105 units.
    Availability accurate as of Oct 25, 2016 08:52.
    Usually ships within one to two business days from La Vergne, TN.
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    More About Bill T. Arnold & John H. Choi

    Bill T. Arnold Dr. Bill T. Arnold is the Paul S. Amos Professor of Old Testament Interpretation. He joined Asbury Theological Seminary’s faculty in 1995. While at Asbury, Dr. Arnold has served as Vice President of Academic Affairs/Provost, Director of Postgraduate Studies, Chair of the Area of Biblical Studies and Director of Hebrew Studies.

    Dr. Arnold is an Elder in the United Methodist Church and pastored churches for six years before moving into Extension Ministry. He holds his ordination with the Kentucky Annual Conference of the UMC. His current Charge Conference is First United Methodist Church, Lexington, Ky.

    Dr. Arnold has written or edited nine books, including most recently Genesis (New Cambridge Bible Commentary Series; Cambridge University Press, 2009). He served as editor of the Old Testament notes for The Wesley Study Bible (Abingdon, 2009), and contributed its study notes on Genesis. He also served as co-translator of Genesis for the Common English Bible (Abingdon, 2011).

    In 2010, Dr. Arnold was awarded a Lilly Faculty Fellowship for his proposal to study the oneness or singularity of God in the Old Testament. In 2003, Dr. Arnold was named alumnus-in-residence at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    Dr. Arnold and his wife, Susan, have three grown sons.

    SPANISH BIO: Bill T. Arnold (PhD, Hebrew Union College) es Director de Estudios Hebreos y Profesor de Antiguo Testamento y de Lenguas Semiticas en el Seminario Teologico Asbury, en Wilmore, Kentucky. Es autor de la obra 'Encountering the Book of Genesis' y tambien coautor de 'Encountering the Old Testament' y de 'A Guide to Biblical Hebrew Syntax'. Bill y su esposa Susan tienen tres hijos y viven en Lexington, Kentucky.

    Bill T. Arnold currently resides in the state of Kentucky. Bill T. Arnold has an academic affiliation as follows - Asbury Theological Seminary, Kentucky.

    Bill T. Arnold has published or released items in the following series...
    1. Encountering Biblical Studies
    2. New Cambridge Bible Commentary
    3. NIV Application Commentary

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    Product Categories

    1Books > Subjects > Reference > Foreign Languages > General
    2Books > Subjects > Reference > Foreign Languages > Instruction > Instruction
    3Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Criticism & Interpretation > General
    4Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Criticism & Interpretation
    5Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > General
    6Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Language Studies
    7Books > Subjects > Religion & Spirituality > Christianity > Reference > Old Testament > Old Testament

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    Reviews - What do customers think about A Guide to Biblical Hebrew Syntax?

    helpful tool, easy read  May 30, 2008
    This is by far the easiest Hebrew Grammar tool I have used. It is very readable and simple to understand and incorporate into Hebrew studies. The only gripe I have is that the outline style organization method is somewhat confusing if you've been studying for more than a couple of hours. Other than that, it is a great tool to use along with a larger lexicon or other more comprehensive resource.
    Great Resource in Managable Volume  Feb 28, 2008
    As a beginning student of Hebrew at the graduate level, I selected this book to supplement our course grammar. I found this text to offer understandable extension to information in the grammar. I am very pleased with my purchase, and believe Arnold and Choi have, in a compact work, provided biblical Hebrew students a very valuable tool for understanding how the language goes together.
    Great Syntax Resource  Feb 14, 2007
    This is a book I've been looking for. It's nice to have a reference book with all the syntax rules organized and structured. I've used a number of grammars for Biblical Hebrew and some of them deal with syntax to one degree or another, but no one has a summary of syntax rules. This is a great complement to one's study of Biblical Hebrew -- it's not a substitute for a grammar book. I highly recommend it before moving on to Waltke and O'Connor.
    Yet another mixed bag of Biblical Grammar: a bit too taxonomic  Dec 10, 2006
    It's stunning that after years of Biblical authorship, we still don't have a good guide to Biblical grammar for beginning or intermediate level students. Biblical grammar is a tricky thing: it is the product of modern scholarship's attempt to reconstruct a Biblical grammar. Arnold and Choi's contribution is helpful in many ways: it allows someone with only basic grammatical knowledge to penetrate and learn Biblical grammar, someone who would otherwise be lost by the concision of Moshe Greenberg or overwhelmed by Gesenius. It will explain to you that there are no tenses in Hebrew, only "aspects" (perfect and imperfect), and it will run down long taxonomical lists of grammatical "uses", such as pages and pages and pages of the various "meanings" of the lamed. (For what it's worth, there is increasing scholarship today that Biblical Hebrew in fact is a tensed language, not an aspected language, though, not surprisingly, Arnold and Choi do not point out that there is an opposing opinion to theirs.)

    The problem, and it is a major one, is that Arnold and Choi make no effort to present to the reader which meanings and uses are relatively established and which are speculative. When I went over many of the uses with a professor of Biblical grammar, I learned that they establish entire categories for uses that occur once in the whole Bible. This is their downfall: if they can make another use or "case," then they will (the astronomical number of special uses of the construct form is absurd), and then they'll tell us that we have to put certain examples in those categories. We are told, for example, that the causative hifil of "see" is the permissive hifil, as in "God let him see" when in fact there is no reason not to translate it "God showed him."

    In a pedagogical sense, this has a negative effect on the reader, since we are led to believe that there are dozens and dozens of uses and cases we must memorize, when in fact they could have saved everyone a lot of trouble by simple estimating frequency next to each of their entries, so a student could know what to concentrate on. Furthermore, their hyper-scholarly approach requires that the reader know lots of grammatical terms, which few students today know.

    Is it helpful at all? Yes, particularly with verb forms. Most students, even those with significant modern Hebrew under their belts, do not understand the verb form uses in the Bible, such as that Nifal is rarely a passive, and is most often a reflexive and sometimes a reciprocal. That's very important when translating the Bible. Similarly, if you don't understand what it means that Pi'el is used causally for statives, then you can't understand Biblical Hebrew, and this book will explain to you what that means (though you will have to look up "stative" in a dictionary), or what a "putative pi'el" is, which is vital. Read those sections of their book five or six times and you'll eventually "get it."

    Still, I personally prefer Moshe Greenberg's Introduction to Hebrew, though that's very short and very dense and assumes you have a basic grounding in Hebrew and grammatical terms.
    A Simple and Comprehensive Guide  Nov 14, 2006
    I have used this book extensively as I have exegeted the Hebrew text and it is fantastic. This guide is snap to use for about 95% of the questions I have regarding the text. The other 5% I use Walkte and O'Connor.

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