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The Mysterious Affair at Styles [Paperback]

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Item Number 247022  
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Item description for The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie...

Agatha Christie's "The Mysterious Affair at Styles," in the revolutionary Bed Book Landscape Reading Format - a new approach to reading in bed as well as other places people enjoy reading while lying down, such as the beach, or on a grassy lawn in the park. Bed Books provide the freedom to lie in any comfortable position without being obligated to sit up in order to read. They can be an essential aid for readers who may be prone to back and neck strain when assuming the contorted body positions normally required for reading while lying down, and for those who have previously found it difficult or impossible to read books in bed, such as the elderly and the disabled. Bed Books can also be read sitting up as easily as with a conventional book. See the current Bed Book Catalog at: www.bedbooks.NET

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Item Specifications...

Pages   144
Est. Packaging Dimensions:   Length: 8.8" Width: 5.9" Height: 0.25"
Weight:   0.5 lbs.
Binding  Softcover
Release Date   Oct 17, 2005
Publisher   A Bed Book
ISBN  1933652241  
ISBN13  9781933652245  

Availability  148 units.
Availability accurate as of Oct 22, 2016 01:30.
Usually ships within one to two business days from La Vergne, TN.
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More About Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie is the best-selling author of all time. She wrote eighty crime novels and story collections, fourteen plays, and several other books. Her books have sold roughly four billion copies and have been translated into 45 languages. She is the creator of the two most enduring figures in crime literature Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple and author of "The Mousetrap," the longest-running play in the history of modern theatre. Christie was born in Torquay, Devon in 1890. She died in 1976 in Wallingford, Oxfordshire."

Agatha Christie lived in Torquay. Agatha Christie was born in 1890 and died in 1976.

Agatha Christie has published or released items in the following series...

  1. Agatha Christie Collection
  2. Agatha Christie Mysteries Collection (Paperback)
  3. Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
  4. Classic Collection (Brilliance Audio)
  5. Hercule Poirot Mysteries
  6. Mary Westmacott Omnibus (Paperback)
  7. Miss Marple Mysteries (Paperback)
  8. Tommy & Tuppence Mysteries

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Product Categories

1Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > Classics
2Books > Subjects > Literature & Fiction > General > Classics
3Books > Subjects > Mystery & Thrillers > Authors, A-Z > ( C ) > Christie, Agatha > General
4Books > Subjects > Mystery & Thrillers > Authors, A-Z > ( C ) > Christie, Agatha > Paperback
5Books > Subjects > Mystery & Thrillers > General
6Books > Subjects > Mystery & Thrillers > Mystery > General

Reviews - What do customers think about The Mysterious Affair at Styles?

"...the colossal cheek of the little man!"  Aug 18, 2008
...I got a hunch about 1/2 way through that one of the characters was the murderer - but could not even begin to see how they did it or were connected. My first read of a Christie book - and I'll be digging in to others since I enjoyed this one so much.
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie   Jun 10, 2008
The Mysterious Affair at Styles: A Hercule Poirot by Agatha Christie

Great eBook for Kindle!
Somewhat Clunky Beginning for the Belgian Sleuth  May 7, 2008
The first "grownup" novels I recall reading were those of Agatha Christie and P.G. Wodehouse, and while I periodically return to Wodehouse with great enjoyment, I haven't revisited the Christie books until now. I figured this, her first published work (written in 1916, published in 1920), would be a good starting place. As well as being her first work, it introduces my favorite of her recurring characters, the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot.

To my surprise, the story takes place during WWI (not after, as many suppose), a detail that plays a minor role in the story. The story is told by Poirot's occasional sidekick (he only appear in eight of the Poirot novels) Captain Hastings, who has been invalided home for the duration of the war. The specifics of his injury aren't explained, but he has gone to the Essex countryside to spend some time at a friend's family mansion (the Styles of the title). Things there prove to be rather tense, as the elderly matriarch has married a much younger man, whom everyone suspects of being a golddigger. Meanwhile, Hastings' friend and his brother are in tenuous financial circumstances due to the provisions of their dead father's will. Of course, the old lady ends up dead, and there are plenty of suspects to go around.

Fortuitously, Hastings runs into Poirot in the local village, where Poirot and some fellow Belgians are living as refugees from the war. The two had apparently met years before, and soon Hastings has enlisted him to investigate the old woman's death. Found dead in her locked room, she appears to have been poisoned, but by whom and how is a mystery. Clues abound (as do plenty of red herrings) in the somewhat complicated story, which finds Poirot already in full form. Alas, he is the only fully developed and lively character to be found, with Hastings already his usual naive sappy self, and none of the rest of cast particularly memorable. As a story, it's somewhat clunky, although all the elements that made Poirot such a popular character are there in abundance (except his mustache mania). Not a great read, but not a bad one either.
And Introducing Monsieur Hercule Poirot  Jan 12, 2008
"The Mysterious Affair At Styles" was Agatha Christie's first mystery novel, in which she introduced her enigmatic and eccentric Belgium detective, Hercule Poirot. She often later lamented that she should have made Poirot younger to begin with as he was to be the star detective in many of her mysteries afterward. But her retired police officer began his magnificent orbit with this intriguing mystery full of the twists and turns that would soon become Christie's trademark.

Wounded at the Western front, Captain Hastings is invalided home and has a chance encounter with his old friend John Cavendish. John invites him to his family's estate for a visit, which Hastings gladly accepts. But Styles, the family's home, is hardly full of happy characters. Both sons are disturbed by their stepmother's behavior - for she has married Alfred Inglethorp, a man twenty years younger than she. Almost everyone is convinced that he is solely after her money and when Mrs. Inglethorp dies suddenly one night of strychnine poisoning, her husband is the immediate suspect. But there are others within the household who would have benefitted from the old lady's death, especially when a fragment of a freshly written will is found burned in her bedchamber. Could someone within her own family have cleverly carried out her murder? Only Hercule Poirot can find all the missing pieces to solve this puzzler of a crime.

Agatha Christie's name is forever cemented in the echelons of mystery writers, and with good reason. Her varied background helped to make her a near expert in matters of poisons, which have played an important role in many of her novels, and her travels to exotic locales have created heightened settings for some of her best mysteries. Her first novel must certainly have been a tough act to follow with its quick pace and plot twists; it fails only at times through its slightly weak narration by Captain Hastings. "The Mysterious Affair At Styles" introduced the world to Agatha Christie, and readers have never looked for better, returning time and again to each mystery she ingeniously crafted.
As It Was in the Beginning  Dec 21, 2007
She didn't really have it together yet but after all it was her first novel! And as such it's pretty amazing how much Hercule Poirot is him glorious self already. pompous, witty, abrasive, yet kind and chivalrous especially to a "woman's secret heart," for he goes to crazy lengths to ake things come out all right for two separate couples by the time STYLES is over.

I just finished Gilbert Adair's abstruse takeoff on Agatha Christie, MYSTERIOUS AFFAIR OF STYLE, so I decided to go back to the real, original thing, see what I hadn't seen in years. I was surprised to find that, in the twenty years since I had read the book, very little of it had remained in my memory--outside of the central trick. In a way, the book is spoiled by an ugly racial remark thatv just seems to slip out of the lips of the one character in the book everyone loves, the faithful white servant "Dorcas." It's not that Christie wants to characterize Dorcas as a prejudiced sort, but just take a look at page 137 and you'll get the shivers. It's rather odd in Christie, for often enough she lets her characters' racialized remarks tell against them, but here it's just the opposite and you can tell that Dorcas is supposed to be more cute after making it.

What's hard to figure out is why, in CURTAIN, Christie decided to return to the scene of her first novel, for it doesn't really have as much weight as some of the country houses she describes elsewhere. Oh well, it must have been a sentimental mise en scene for her, the site of the meeting of Hastings and Poirot; the place where her first novel located itself, etc. CURTAIN is a book very few of us have ever been able to plumb to its depths--and I thought a reread of STYLES might help. No, but it's great fun all on its own, and the plot is so crazily complicated that it takes the final fifty pages to work out all the kinks and false solutions of the story, before Poirot finally shows what his "last link" has led him to.

One more thing that was strange, how there are only 12 chapters in the book, of very uneven lengths--some a few pages only, some upwards of 30. I don't remember Christie ever returning to this noticeably choppy way of telling a story?

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